TASCHEN at form & concept

TASCHEN book murals of tibet at form & concept
Murals of Tibet

Lovers of beautiful books, rejoice! form & concept is now an official seller of TASCHEN Books, the revolutionary German imprint that deserves its own art museum. TASCHEN has collaborated with the likes of David HockneyChristo & Jeanne-Claude and Beatriz Milhazes to produce limited edition books that are true works of art. We’re particularly excited about their new title Murals of Tibet, an epic chronicle of some of the greatest treasures of Buddhist culture and Tibetan heritage.

For more than a decade, photographer Thomas Laird traveled the length, breadth, and far-flung corners of Tibet’s plateau to capture the land’s spectacular Buddhist murals. Deploying new multi-image digital photography, Laird compiled the world’s first archive of these artworks, some walls as wide as 10 meters, in life-size resolution. In recognition of this World Heritage landmark and preservation of Tibetan culture, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama has signed all copies of this Collector’s Edition. As pictured, Murals of Tibetcomes with a stand designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect and humanitarian pioneer Shigeru Ban.

Click the images below to view more books from TASCHEN, now available from form & concept. Browse all of our TASCHEN titles and other books in our online shop.

 

andy warhol book at form and concept
Andy Warhol, 7 Illustrated Books

 

Beatriz Milhazes book at form and concpet
Beatriz Mihazes
Christo Book Floating Piers at form and concept
Christo, Floating Piers
The Gates by Christo at form and concept
Christo, The Gates
TASCHEN book Christopher Wool at form & concept
Christopher Wool
David Hockney TASCHEN Book at form & concept
David Hockney, A Bigger Book 

 

 

Design Spotlight: Laritza Garcia & Lisa Klakulak

Laritza Garcia

Laritza Garcia- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Sicily wears artwork by Laritza Garcia.

We’re pleased to introduce our newest represented artist, Laritza Garcia. Here’s the story of her Still Life collection, in her own words:

This collection explores nature as a subject for jewelry. The growth patterns featured in the work draw inspiration from the botanical prints of the Hortus Eystettensis, a 15th century codex of the Garden of Eichstatt. My jewelry arrangements, similar to the prints, are composed with aesthetic considerations above botanical taxonomy. The collection is reflective upon natural aspects that are skewed by human intervention. The static jewelry compositions appear in full bloom, linked to parallel perceptions of what is natural and what is artificial in our surroundings. Each piece is made from hand pierced brass sheets. The surfaces are powder coated with layers of bold colors reminiscent of urban culture. 

Laritza Garcia- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Laritza Garcia, Delphinium Cuff Bracelet, brass, powder coat, 3 x 3 x 1.5 in.
Laritza Garcia- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Laritza Garcia, Painted Flowers Earrings, brass, powder coat, sterling silver posts, 1.5 x 1.5 x 0.5 in.
Laritza Garcia- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Laritza Garcia, Periwinkle Dome Necklace,brass, powder coat, 19″ length.

Lisa Klakulak

Lisa Klakulak- Felt Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Sicily wears artwork by Lisa Klakulak.

Lisa Klakulak debuts a series of deep blue, wearable artworks. She discusses why she works in wool fiber, and the adventure that inspired the new work:

I’m a visual artist who has found a strong affinity for working with wool fiber, and in particular the felting process. Attracted by its protective and nurturing qualities, I found wool fiber a relevant to use in my work that’s related to concepts of human vulnerability and security. I attribute the sense of contentment and calm that I feel when I’m working in the studio to the constant touch involved in the process, as well as bringing an idea into fruition. You need that idea, that inspiration. What is it that you want to say and communicate in your work? I have to schedule in time to adventure, to look, to think, not just to make. In my life and in my art, I have to find balance between the routine and the spontaneous. I do that by taking any opportunity to adventure wildly into the unknown, encountering other cultural systems, places, phenomena. One of the things that I’ve been most grateful for in my life is the opportunity to travel abroad to teach. I recently got to travel into southern Chile and seek some glaciers for the first time, and that’s what’s been inspiring all of the blue work, and all of the angular, structural forms.

Lisa Klakulak- Felt Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Capped Accumulation, felt, mixed media, 11 x 8.5 x 3 in.
Lisa Klakulak- Felt Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Within, felt, mixed media, 15 x 7 x 1.5 in.
Lisa Klakulak- Felt Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Untitled Bracelet, felt, mixed media, 3.5 x 3.5 x 0.5 in.
Lisa Klakulak- Felt Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Untitled Earrings, felt, mixed media, 3 x 1.5 x 0.75 in.

Click here to browse the complete form & concept shop collection.

Design Spotlight: Danny Hart & Tania Larsson.

Danny Hart

Danny Hart- Tania Larsson- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Sicily wears artwork by Danny Hart & Tania Larsson.

I was born and raised in New Mexico, the Land of Enchantment. Spending my childhood in Santa Fe cultivated my passion for creative processes and design. I later studied Architecture at the University of New Mexico, which allowed my appreciation for design to manifest into a functional practice. Drawing inspiration from the colorful landscape of my home state, my Father’s influence in woodwork, my Mom’s inherent craftiness and my architectural background I have consolidated these influences in contemporary lifestyle accessories.

Danny Hart

Danny Hart- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Danny Hart, Walnut/Maple White Sunburst Earrings, wood, stainless steel, acrylic.
Danny Hart- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Danny Hart, Walnut White Acrylic Sterling Silver Feather Pendant, walnut, sterling silver.
Danny Hart- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Danny Hart, Walnut Sleeping Beauty Turquoise Acrylic Stainless Steel Faceted Pendant, walnut, stainless steel.
Danny Hart- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Danny Hart, Large Walnut Teal Earrings, wood, stainless steel, acrylic.

Tania Larsson

Tania Larsson- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kate wears artwork by Tania Larsson.

Tania Larsson is of Gwich’in and Swedish descent and she was born and raised in France. At the age of fifteen, she moved to Canada with her family with the goal of reconnecting to her culture and her land. She is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Fine Arts with a focus in digital arts and jewelry at the Institute of American Indian Arts. Tania is a founding member of Dene Nahjo, a non-profit organization that focuses on cultural revitalization projects. She constantly seeks out opportunities to learn traditional practices such as tanning hides on the land, making tools and sewing. To create her intricate jewelry works, she combines her traditional skills and contemporary arts education.

Tania Larsson- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Tania Larsson, Muskox Shield Ring, diamond, 22k gold, sterling silver, muskox horn.
Tania Larsson- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Tania Larsson, Long Muskox and Vintage Venetian Glass Bead Necklace, muskox horn, vintage Venetian glass beads, sterling silver.
Tania Larsson- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Tania Larsson, Muskox Horn Round Pendant, horn, sterling silver.
Tania Larsson- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Tania Larsson, Muskox Horn Studs, muskox horn, sterling silver.

Click here to browse the complete form & concept shop collection.

Preview: Introducing Ford / Forlano.

“The conversation is in every piece,” says David Forlano. “The input is the journey.” He and Steven Ford have collaborated for nearly four decades under the moniker Ford / Forlano, creating wearable artworks from polymer clay, sterling silver, gold leaf and many other materials. Over the years, their designs have undergone a spectacular evolution—as has the nature of their working relationship. Forlano moved to Santa Fe in 2005, putting almost 2,000 miles between the longtime collaborators. “It has actually made the work more dynamic, with an even bigger range,” Ford says. form & concept presents Introducing Ford / Forlano, featuring the artistic duo’s latest work, on Friday, February 23 from 5 to 8 pm. 

Ford and Forlano met in Rome, where they were both in a study abroad program through Philadelphia’s Tyler School of Art. “We had studios next to each other, but our styles of painting and thinking about art were worlds apart,” says Forlano. “I had never met someone like him.” Forlano had a passion for color theory and aesthetics, while Ford was more focused on structure and materials. After returning from Italy, they moved into a big house with some college friends. “I think because we were in art school and hungry, we were fascinated with the opposites,” Forlano says. “It opened both of our worlds to looking at things from the perspective of the other.”

Steven Ford- David Forlano- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Tube Necklace #67, polymer, sterling silver.

Not long after they graduated, a friend of Ford’s sparked his interest in polymer clay as an artistic medium. At the time, the material was widely considered a toy for children. Ford had studied glass art early in his college career, and was interested in applying that skill set to polymer clay artworks. He and Forlano set about experimenting with the material, using a technique called caning (known in the glass world as millefiori) to create and scale patterns in the clay. “In the beginning, we really promoted the work as ‘hey, look at this interesting material and what we can do with it.’” says Ford.

They built a successful business teaching workshops and selling polymer clay jewelry to shops and galleries across the nation. “Eventually, we found that our work was not evolving because we were teaching the same things over and over again,” Ford explains. The artistic use of polymer clay had also become more popular—in large part due to Ford and Forlano’s work—and they were looking to distinguish themselves in the burgeoning market. “We stopped teaching, which was scary,” says Ford. “But our work took off then and got really interesting.”

Steve Ford- David Forlano- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Ribbon Brooch #22, polymer, sterling silver.

In 1999, Ford / Forlano began working with a metalsmith to incorporate sterling silver and other precious metals into their polymer clay designs. The move vaulted them into the world of fine jewelry. “The best galleries, the ones we had watched at craft shows for years, stopped at our booth,” says Forlano. “They said they’d been hoping we would do that for years.” Their transition from wholesale to high-end was successful, and the duo zeroed in on a signature aesthetic. “In particular, the way we use color is a voice. That’s something that I feel like kind of secures a little corner for us,” Forlano says. “I think that’s how we got to be who we are.”

Both artists like to compare their use of color to mixing paint on a palette. “Ultimately, polymer should be like paint, it’s just a material for expression,” says Ford.  “I want to think about color, line and texture—all of the things that a painter thinks about.” Towards the beginning of their careers, when they’d just left art school, the duo took this quite literally. “At that time, we really had no idea what jewelry was or meant,” Forlano says. “We just made basically little paintings.”

Steven Ford- David Forlano- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Cuff #7, polymer, sterling silver.

Then came Forlano’s big move. In 2005, he decided to resettle in Santa Fe to live with his partner, actress Debrianna Mansini. “Frankly, I thought we were doomed when he did that,” says Ford. “We’d been working literally side-by-side up until that point.” Forlano cleared out his workstation in their Philadelphia studio, a building that filled an entire downtown city block, and headed Southwest.

Ford and Forlano’s ability to provide instant feedback to each other was replaced by phone calls, emails and the U.S. Postal Service. It slowed the pace of production, but took their work in compelling new directions. “When Dave moved to Santa Fe, I noticed that his colors got really desert-like and dusty,” says Ford. “I wanted cool, bright gem tones and he would send me these sandstone-looking things.”

Steven Ford- David Forlano- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Tube Necklace #68, polymer, sterling silver.

Ford has since left their old space for a smaller studio nearby, and Forlano married Mansini not long after his move. Through transitions large and small, their collaboration has endured. “We have lots of battles, we’re kind of like an old married couple,” says Ford. “But when he says something, I understand it in a way that I don’t think many people would.” Forlano adds, “As artists, we of course bring our egos to the table. We have a voice, we want to be heard. In a really healthy collaboration, that’s not going to get pushed under the table or pushed aside. It’s going to enhance the other person’s vision.”

This special event coincides with the opening reception for Strangers Collective’s Mirror Box group exhibition. Click here to learn more about both events.

Browse Ford / Forlano’s work.
RSVP on Facebook.

This Friday: Strangers Collective & Ford / Forlano

Alicia Piller Sculpture- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Alicia Piller, Celestial Body (detail), leather, mixed media, 50 x 17 x 17 in., 2014.

Opening
Strangers Collective
MIRROR BOX

February 23 – April 14, 2018

Opening Reception: Friday, February 23, 5-8 pm

Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill and Jordan Eddy, co-directors of Strangers Collective and the No Land art space, curate this exhibition of emerging artists and writers. The term “mirror box” originates in the medical field: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran invented the box with two back-to-back mirrors in the center to help amputees manage phantom limb pain. The patient places the “good” limb into one side, and the “residual” limb into the other, making mirrored movements that can trick the brain into believing that it’s moving the phantom limb. “It’s a tribute to the incredible power of grey matter,” says Eddy. “If our minds are capable of conjuring a nervous system from thin air, can we link up with people, places or things in the same visceral but invisible way?” The curatorial team realized that art, like the mirror box, can act as a conduit for this type of transcendent—but also highly tangible—experience.

Learn more about this exhibition.
RSVP on Facebook.

Ford / Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Hydro Brooch #422, polymer, sterling silver, gold leaf.

Special Reception
Introducing Ford / Forlano

Friday, February 23, 5-8 pm

“The conversation is in every piece,” says David Forlano. “The input is the journey.” He and Steven Ford have collaborated for nearly four decades under the moniker Ford / Forlano, creating wearable artworks from polymer clay, sterling silver, gold leaf and many other materials. Over the years, their designs have undergone a spectacular evolution—as has the nature of their working relationship. Forlano moved to Santa Fe in 2005, putting almost 2,000 miles between the longtime collaborators. “It has actually made the work more dynamic, with an even bigger range,” Ford says. form & concept presents Introducing Ford / Forlano, featuring the artistic duo’s latest work.

Learn more about this event.
RSVP on Facebook.

New Artwork: Brian Fleetwood.

Brian Fleetwood Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Brian Fleetwood, Sea Cucumber Brooch, foam, rubber, stainless steel.

Santa Fe-based jewelry artist Brian Fleetwood translates imagery from his studies of biology, ecology, systems and taxonomy into wearable art using a stunning range of materials and techniques. Fleetwood’s new series of sea organism-inspired work could’ve been plucked straight from a coral reef. The new brooches and earrings reflect the diversity of life forms found in the ocean, inviting us to adorn ourselves with this beauty—and gain a fresh understanding of the natural world. View selections from the new collection below, and take a deep dive on the form & concept shop website.

Brian Fleetwood Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Brian Fleetwood, Jellyfish Earrings, rubber, copper, sterling silver.
Brian Fleetwood Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Brian Fleetwood, Black Coral Brooch, foam, rubber, stainless steel.
Brian Fleetwood Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Brian Fleetwood, Kelp Earrings (Blue), rubber, copper, sterling silver.

Click here to browse all of Brian Fleetwood’s artwork in the form & concept collection.

January at form & concept.


Last Friday Art Walk- Santa Fe Railyard Arts District- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Our final event of the year is the Santa Fe Railyard Arts District’s Last Friday Art Walk, on December 29 from 5-7 pm! Swing by to see or current shows and pick up the first-ever form & concept annual catalog, which includes the gallery’s complete 2018 exhibition schedule. Here’s a first look at our January exhibitions & events:

Smitten Forum Exhibition- Gallery Talk- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Gallery Talk

Smitten Forum

Wednesday, January 3, 2-3 pm

Call it a mobile artist colony, a colorful social experiment or a crafty piece of performance art. Each year since 2014, Sara Brown and Marissa Saneholtz have invited a new group of pioneering jewelers and metalsmiths to work side-by-side in a communal studio for 7 days. The initiative is called Smitten Forum, and invitees range from emerging to well-established makers who employ a staggering array of mediums and techniques. This year’s participants are headed to Abiquiu, New Mexico in late December, but they’ll also leave their mark on the nearby art center of Santa Fe. A curator’s talk featuring Brown, Saneholtz and 2014 Smitten Forum participant Robert Ebendorf will take place on Wednesday, January 3 from 2-3 pm.

Learn more on our website.
RSVP on Facebook.

Ritual Prayer Performance- Ekalos Reed- Aine McCarthy- Kara Duval- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Special Event

A Day of Ritual Prayer Performance

In conjunction with Thais Mather’s exhibition Reckless Abandon,
and featuring Ekalos Reed, Áine McCarthy & Kara Duval

Saturday, January 20, 7 am-7pm

“I find that people are really hungering for ritual and prayer, and not in a traditional, religious way,” says Ekalos Reed. Reed and Áine McCarthy’s performance art group is called Time Beings. This winter, they collaborate with Kara Duval—another local performer who explores themes of ritual, reclamation and healing—for a 12-hour performance among the artworks of form & concept’s exhibition Thais Mather: Reckless Abandon. In the multi-part ritual prayer, they will convene other Santa Fe artists and anyone who wishes to take part as they create moments and spaces that redefine the sacred. The piece represents a dynamic response to the exhibition’s themes and a tribute to women and others who have faced persecution. Reed and McCarthy perform ‘Tending the Mighty Dead’ from 7 am to 7 pm. Kara Duval performs ‘Red’ from 4:30- 6:30 pm. There is a closing ceremony from 6- 7 pm. From 7 to 10 am, the performance will be visible from outside form & concept, but the gallery does not open to the public until 10 am.

Learn more on our website.
RSVP on Facebook.

Image: Kara Duval, Red, durational performance piece. Photo by Kara Duval.

Fiber Artist Jodi Colella- Unidentified Women Solo Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Artist Talk & Opening

Jodi Colella: Unidentified Women

Artist Talk & Preview: Thursday, January 25, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, January 26, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

It started somewhere among the vast archives of the Historic Northampton Museum in Northampton, Massachusetts. Fiber artist Jodi Colella was working on an art project inspired by the museum’s headwear collection, and she stumbled upon a series of daguerreotype portraits. “They were like little 18th and 19th century selfies,” Colella says. “I noticed that all the men in the images had every single detail of their life listed in the catalog. About 80% of the women were labeled ‘unidentified.’”

The artist was fascinated by these forgotten, female faces, and the contrast between the women’s fleeting social visibility and their invisibility to history. After hunting down similar portraits in flea markets and antique shops, Colella stitched intricate embroideries across the images, further obscuring the women’s identities. The body of work, titled Unidentified Women, makes its Santa Fe debut at form & concept on Friday, January 26 from 5-7 pm. Colella will appear at the opening reception, and also conduct an artist talk and preview on Thursday, January 25 from 2-3 pm.

Learn more on our website.
RSVP for the reception Facebook.

Image: Jodi Colella, Leaf (detail), found daguerreotype & embroidery, 2016.

Flying Blue Buffalo Kickstarter Campaign- Artist Armond Lara- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Kickstarter Campaign & Special Event

Armond Lara: Flying Blue Buffalo Project

Kickstarter Launch: Friday, January 26, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Open House & Panel: Wednesday, February 17, 2-5 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

“Buffalo are masters of survival,” says Armond Lara. “They’re still around today, even though we tried our best to kill them all off.” The Mexican-Diné artist has depicted buffalo in his drawings, paintings and sculptures for decades. In recent years, they’ve turned blue and sprouted wings. The winged blue buffalo reference a dark chapter of Lara’s family history: his grandmother, who was Diné, was kidnapped as a child and forced into servitude by a Mexican family. This was a common story in the American West. Across three centuries of Spanish, Mexican and American rule, millions of Native children were enslaved as household servants or field hands.

The Pueblo people called these abducted youths “lost bluebirds,” a symbol that Lara combined with the buffalo into a new icon of Indigenous survival. This August, he’ll collaborate with form & concept to fulfill his long-held dream of creating a monumental installation of flying blue buffalo sculptures that explores this little-told history. The Flying Blue Buffalo Project Kickstarter campaign, running January 26 through February 28 and anchored by a special event on February 17, will raise funds to support the production of over seventy 3D printed buffalo, based on a series of wood carvings by Lara.

Learn more on our website.

Image: Digital rendering of Armond Lara’s 3D-printed Flying Blue Buffalo3D Proven Systems.

Click here to view the complete form & concept event schedule.

Stocking Stuffers.

Stop by form & concept for affordable gifts from our gallery shop! From earrings to ceramics, you’ll find something for everyone on your list. For last-minute shoppers, we’re open on Saturday, December 23 from 10 am to 5 pm.

The gallery will be closed for the holidays from 12/24/17 through 1/2/17, except for the Santa Fe Railyard’s Last Friday Art Walk on 12/29 from 5-7 pm.

Holiday Gifts Under $100- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Wearable art by Danny HartGinger DunnillRand Marco & Charles Greeley.

Ceramics- Holiday Gifts- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Collectible ceramics by Susan BeinerWesley AndereggWookjae Maeng, and Rachel Donner.

Microcosm Small Works Invitational- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New MexicoOver 20 artists, craftspeople and designers from past form & concept shows return with artworks that measure 8 x 10 inches or smaller in the MICROCOSM small works invitational.

Click here to browse the complete form & concept collection.

Elegant Collections.

Happy holidays from form & concept! Discover elegant, wearable creations by some of our favorite jewelers.

Janis Kerman Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

“Doing something symmetrical or identical is simple. You only work out one problem. When you have to work out something that has to be balanced—that is a pair, but not identical—that is for me more challenging and much more fun.”
Janis Kerman

Alexandra Hart Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

“Dramatically alluring yet signally protective natural organic forms inspire me, such as the radiating shape of the anemone, the sensuous curves of the nudibranch, and the concave surfaces of the cactus. I hope to create jewelry which captures the delicate balance of the bold and sculptural with the sensual and graceful.”
Alexandra Hart

Victor Atyas Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

“My three-dimensional constructed gold and silver pieces are suited to be worn—or even framed and hung on a wall.”
Victor Atyas

Click here to browse the complete form & concept collection.

Meet Ford / Forlano.

Steven Ford and David Forlano- Ford/Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford/Forlano, Center Brooch #134, polymer, sterling silver, gold leaf.

We’re pleased to introduce our newest represented artists, Steven Ford and David Forlano. This is the story of their long-running collaboration, Ford / Forlano, in their own words:

Our artistic collaboration began in 1984, when we met in Rome during a year abroad program through Tyler School of Art. Immediately we were intrigued by some essential differences in our approach to painting, and these distinctions led to heated debates.

David created large, abstract paintings, focusing on the richness of surface treatment. Steve’s work, in contrast, addressed the question, “How can I make a painting as an object, a fully integrated three-dimensional piece?” We liked how our differences challenged our individual thinking. To learn from each other, we started trading half-finished drawings and paintings and working both of our individual ideas into them.

Steven Ford and David Forlano- Ford/Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford/Forlano, Big Bead Necklace #49, polymer, sterling silver.

This “swapping” has become an essential element to our collaboration. After years of working side by side, David moved to Santa Fe in 2005. We have tables in our Philadelphia studio with half-finished brooches. Steve sends them to David, who develops them further. Other threads from our art-school days continue to be important. While David’s strength has always been to push color, pattern and surface in new directions, Steve is constantly fascinated by three-dimensional structures and the ways things fit together mechanically.

Throughout our collaboration, we have often looked to nature for inspiration. In seed clusters, shell formations and flower buds, for instance, numerous carefully organized parts, seemingly identical, but really unique, are arranged beautifully. These exquisite structures led us into new ways of envisioning necklaces, for example, both three-dimensionally and texturally.

Steven Ford and David Forlano- Ford/Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford/Forlano, Ring #12, polymer, sterling silver.

Many of our brooches are like collections of fragments. Not necessarily of literal fragments, like shards of pottery, but more like conceptual fragments, like a piece of music, a chapter from a story, an ingredient from a cuisine or an element of a language. At some point, however, we let the references subside and allow the color, abstract patterns and form to lead us. The work feels complete to us when the balance of elements – abstract and imagistic – comes into focus in some unusual way. At the same time, the viewer is free to gather his/her own impression of these suggested images.

Steven Ford and David Forlano- Ford/Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford/Forlano, Button Earrings #229, polymer, sterling silver.