Mayor’s Arts Awards 2017

Sandy Zane- Form & Concept Gallery- Mayor's Arts Awards 2017- Javier Gonzales- Santa Fe New Mexico

Our very own Sandy Zane is a recipient of the 2017 Mayor’s Arts Awards. She will be honored by Mayor Javier Gonzales at a ceremony next month. Here’s an excerpt from Megan Bennett’s write-up on this year’s award recipients in Albuquerque Journal North:

Along with being a gallery owner, Sandy Zane is serving on boards at Creative Santa Fe, Creative Startups and the Santa Fe Community College Foundation, where she heads the Art on Campus Committee. She has also sponsored Currents New Media nearly every year. She also supports the New Mexico School for the Arts.

“I’ve always been passionate about whatever it is I’m doing,” said Zane about why she enjoys giving back to the Santa Fe arts scene. “I don’t like to do anything halfway.”‘

Read the full article here.

Time to break the box.

JESS X SNOW Art- Broken Boxes Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
JESS X SNOW, TO SURVIVE, I TURNED MY BODY INTO A PRAYER FOR THE EARTH, digital photography and poetry.

It’s opening weekend of Broken Boxes, an exhibition featuring the art and ideas of over 40 visual artists, filmmakers, sound artists, activists, performance artists and community organizers from around the world who are effecting change through their work. The show is co-curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, and all invited artists have participated in an interview on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast over the past 2 years. Here’s Megan Bennett’s take on the show from today’s Albuquerque Journal North:

 Ian Kuali'i Art- Broken Boxes Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ian Kuali’i, For They Know Not What They Do/Those Who Don’t, hand-cut paper and mixed media.

A local podcaster is giving a platform to artists from outside society’s mainstream experience through a gallery exhibition starting this evening.

The exhibition, titled “Broken Boxes” after Ginger Dunnill’s podcast of the same name, is displaying work from some of the people Dunnill has interviewed since starting her show in 2014. All the artists, activists or community organizers involved in the show are either Native American, queer-identifying or non-binary, transgender, women, or people of color.

“My main focus for the podcast is to celebrate artists that are outside of the scope of the cis(gender) white male format that is really prevalent in the art world,” said Dunnill, who is co-curating the show with husband and Native artist Cannupa Hanska Luger.

“I wanted to celebrate … people who are doing the really important work in society and often don’t get to share their stories in a personal way with community members that can really benefit from hearing what their work is doing,” she said.

Click here to read the rest of the article. Michael Abatemarco covered Broken Boxes in Pasatiempo‘s Mixed Media column:

Valentina Gonzalez Art- Broken Boxes Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Valentina Gonzalez, Cultural Value-vs-Property Value, 2017, aerosol paint and wood.

[Broken Boxes is] a good adjunct to the Native arts festivals happening around town this weekend, providing a look at some of the more challenging and cutting-edge works done by Native and non-Native artists alike. “I am interested in creating content that honors the intersections where our stories overlap, and which refuses to box us out of each other’s narratives,” said Dunnill in a statement.

Click here to read the full column, and join us for the Broken Boxes opening weekend events on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Tonight’s opening reception (8/18, 5-8 pm) features an appearance by Winona LaDuke of Honor the Earth and documentarian Keri Pickett. A traveling show called Art of the Indigenous Resistance, curated by Kim Smith, fills the downstairs of our atrium. Broken Boxes spans our top floor, anchored by monumental installations by Chip Thomas, Nani Chacon and Demian DinéYazhi’. Get all the details on the Broken Boxes exhibition page, and make sure to RSVP for opening weekend on Facebook.

Best of Santa Fe

Best of Santa Fe 2017- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

form & concept is nominated for Best Gallery in Best of Santa Fe 2017! Make sure to cast your vote before polls close on May 31. Our category is in the Arts & Entertainment section. Thanks to Santa Fe Reporter for putting on this awesome local contest. It would be an honor to receive your vote!

form and concept- Best Gallery- Best of Santa Fe 2017

Native Realities

Native Realities- Arigon Starr- Santa Fe New MexicoIndiginerds assemble! Native Realities: Superheroes of Past, Present, and Future opens tonight (Friday, Nov. 11) from 5-7 pm. Join us at form & concept to meet professional Native comic artists and their pint-size sidekicks from Zuni Pueblo. Lee Francis IV, CEO of Native Realities Publishing, united all of them for this special exhibition that celebrates a brand new pantheon. Now more than ever, the world needs superheroes!

Jackie Jadrnak of Journal North investigates:

Step aside, Spider-Man. Fold your wings, Batman. Super Indian and leagues of other Native American comic book superheroes are coming to Santa Fe. … [Native Realities] is a warm-up for what is being hailed as the first, ever or anywhere, Indigenous Comic Con, which will be held at Albuquerque’s National Hispanic Cultural Center on Nov. 18-20 and will include the artists whose work will be on view in the Santa Fe exhibit. They are Weshoyot Alvitre (Tongva), Jonathan Nelson (Diné), Jon Proudstar (Yaqui), Ryan Singer (Navajo) and Arigon Starr (Kickapoo).

Native Realities- Zuni Pueblo Youth Create Comics- Santa Fe New Mexico

Meanwhile at Pasatiempo, Casey Sanchez reports on Lee’s work with Zuni Pueblo youth:

“We encouraged the Zuni students to think about the everyday superheroes in their life,” Francis said. “Your mechanic, your water delivery man, your school teachers are heroes solving problems every single day. We also asked students to think in comic-book terms about how they would solve a crisis happening in the Zuni community.” For example, one sixth-grade girl created Yucca Girl, a comic superhero who brings rain to Zuni gardens. In a press release, she described how the character coalesced out of the yucca basket-weaving she had been doing to grieve her sister’s death. The Zuni comic project came out of a joint initiative by tribal leaders, Creative Startups — a Santa Fe- based incubator for art entrepreneurs — and the University of New Mexico’s Indigenous Design and Planning Institute.

Click here to learn more, and make sure to fly by the exhibition tonight to meet the artists and munch on traditional food. On Saturday, Nov. 12, return to form & concept for a Gallery Talk featuring Lee Francis IV, Michaela Shirley and Ted Jojola of Indigenous Design + Planning Institute, and Alice Loy of Creative Startups on Saturday, from 2-3 pm. RSVP to the Gallery Talk on Facebook for updates.

Review of Made in the Desert, from THE Magazine, July 2016

White noise appears to pulse from Melissa Cody’s textile, Navajo Transcendent. Surrounded by neon-colored stepped patterns, reminiscent of the traditional Navajo “Germantown dazzler,” blocks of black and white pixels vibrate with visual intensity. Cody, who pivots between weaving, hip hop, and graphic art, is among twelve artists who are redefining “craft” in form & concept’s inaugural exhibition, Made in the Desert (through August 22). Like Cody, who remixes long-established motifs and media with contemporary pigments and compositions, other artists in Made in the Desert nod to the past, present, and future in their offerings.

read more

form & concept Around the Web

2013-Devil-Horns-Crystal-Brass-Knuckles-bigCongrats to Debra Baxter, whose piece Devil Horns Crystal Brass Knuckles (Lefty) will be a part of the upcoming Smithsonian exhibition: Connections: Contemporary Craft from the Permanent Collection at the Renwick Gallery. The Opening will be June 30, 2016.

Lisa Rich was featured on 3D Start Point’s podcast last week.

Virtual Object was previewed in the New Mexican, Journal NorthSanta Fe Reporter and reviewed in Visual Art Source.