Closing Reception: Debra Baxter | Tooth & Nail

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Join Debra Baxter for a last look at her solo exhibition Tooth & Nail at this closing reception on Friday, June 15 from 5 to 7 pm. The show officially closes on June 16, 2018.

Baxter frequently picks up materials she’s never used before, searching for novel ways to engage the histories of sculpture, jewelry, weaponry or drapery. For Tooth & Nail, the events of the #MeToo movement have fed into her continued interest in the strength, vulnerability and the raw power of the female voice. The courage of these women has activated work with a blend of toughness and vulnerability. “These contrasting materials carry a similar spirit,” she explains. “My sculptures sometimes look delicate, but when they’re finished, they are structurally resilient.”

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception | Friday, April 27, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk | Saturday, May 19, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Reception | Saturday, June 15, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook

Artist Talk: Debra Baxter | Tooth & Nail

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Debra Baxter has exhibited her sculptures and jewelry at form & concept since the gallery’s founding in May 2016. She helped lay the foundations of the gallery’s mission: to challenge preconceived notions about art, craft and design and blur their borders. “Debra is a master of what I call ‘material inversion,’” says Frank Rose, Gallery Director at form & concept. “She might pair soft materials with hard ones, or take it one step further and make a dense medium look like it’s light and flowing. She creates invigorating visual and tactile experiences, but there’s also a boundary-shattering conceptual element to the work.”

Baxter will conduct an artist talk on Saturday, May 19 from 2 to 3 pm. Tooth & Nail opens on Friday, April 27 from 5 to 7 pm, and runs through June 16, 2018.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception | Friday, April 27, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk | Saturday, May 19, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Reception | Saturday, June 15, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook

Opening: Debra Baxter | Tooth & Nail

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“This thing could fail, and it could be a nightmare,” says Debra Baxter. “But who cares?” The Santa Fe sculptor makes artworks that combine divergent materials—metal, glass and stone, for example—so there’s always a risk that they’ll split apart during the creative process. Informed by her passion for armor and weaponry, Baxter charges ahead fearlessly to create elegant and sometimes dangerous objects. Her new solo exhibition at form & concept, Tooth & Nail, includes flowing bronze breastplates that hold glittering minerals, and metal throwing stars that are cast from lace. There’s also a wicked bronze-and-quartz sculpture from her Smithsonian-collected brass knuckles series. “I’ll often emerge from these crazy material experiments bruised—but I’m never broken,” says Baxter. 

Baxter’s solo exhibition Tooth & Nail opens on Friday, April 27 from 5 to 7 pm, and runs through June 16, 2018. Baxter will conduct an artist talk on Saturday, May 19 from 2 to 3 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception | Friday, April 27, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk | Saturday, May 19, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Reception | Saturday, June 15, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook

Zine Reading: MIRROR BOX

Strangers Collective‘s Mirror Box exhibition at form & concept features zines by emerging artists and writers. A number of the zine creators will read from and discuss their work at this event on Saturday, April 7 from 3-4 pm.

Mirror Box represents a network of early career creatives, starting in Santa Fe and spiraling across the nation. Its curatorial throughline presents a radical method for reflecting on place and identity through art objects.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, 2/23, 5-8 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Curator & Artist Talk: Saturday, 3/17, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Zine Reading: Saturday, 4/7, 3-4 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Performance by Emmaly Wiederholt: Saturday, 4/14, 7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
$5-$25 suggested donation for closing performance.

Writers

Liz Brindley, Caryn Crimmel, Jordan Eddy, Pascal Emmer, Jess Haring, Katie Johnson, Israel Francisco Haros Lopez, Amanda Malloy & David McCarty, Erin Mickelson, Erica Nguyen, Yvette Serrano, Bucket Siler, Emmaly Wiederholt, Rachelle Woods, Michael Wilson

Image: Derek ChanMercury in Retrograde (detail), acrylic, silver leaf and collage on panel, 72 x 48 in., 2013. Photo by Jose Rivera.

Opening: Wesley Anderegg | ARIZONA

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“Everybody that lives in New Mexico goes to Arizona every once in awhile,” says Wesley Anderegg. “That’s the only reason Arizona exists, is to drive through to go to California.” It’s a particularly sacrilegious statement for a born-and-raised Arizonan, but Anderegg hasn’t lived there for decades. He’s also never directly revisited his wild childhood through his figurative ceramics—until now. “As you get older, you kind of get reminiscing,” says the California-based artist. “It’s like, oh man, I’m on the downslope these days. Time to look back.”

In a new series of diminutive ceramic tiles, Anderegg flattens his tragicomic sculptural figures with a playful nod to Pop Art paintings and comic book panels. The painted compositions evoke Anderegg’s experience growing up in the sun-drenched and lawless Sonoran Desert. Wesley Anderegg: ARIZONA debuts at form & concept on Friday, March 30 from 5 to 7 pm. Anderegg recognizes the humor of mounting a show called ARIZONA one state to the east, but it’s a simple matter of personal preference. “I thought about actually having it in Arizona, but I like you guys better,” he says with a grin.

Wesley Anderegg: ARIZONA debuts at form & concept on Friday, March 30 from 5 to 7 pm, with an artist talk on Saturday, March 31 from 2 to 3 pm. The show runs through May 19, 2018.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, March 30, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, March 31, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook

Opening: MIRROR BOX | Strangers Collective

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Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill and Jordan Eddy, co-directors of Strangers Collective and the No Land art space, curate this exhibition of emerging artists and writers at form & concept. Mirror Box represents a network of early career creatives, starting in Santa Fe and spiraling across the nation. Its curatorial throughline presents a radical method for reflecting on place and identity through art objects. The show opens with a reception on Friday, February 23 from 5-8 pm, and runs through April 14, 2018. 

The term “mirror box” originates in the medical field: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran invented the box with two back-to-back mirrors in the center to help amputees manage phantom limb pain. The patient places the “good” limb into one side, and the “residual” limb into the other, making mirrored movements that can trick the brain into believing that it’s moving the phantom limb. “It’s a tribute to the incredible power of grey matter,” says Eddy. “If our minds are capable of conjuring a nervous system from thin air, can we link up with people, places or things in the same visceral but invisible way?” The curatorial team realized that art, like the mirror box, can act as a conduit for this type of transcendent—but also highly tangible—experience.

“As we turned over the idea of a ‘mirror box’ in conversation, its meaning evolved to represent a sort of theoretical art object,” says Farrell. “If you imagine a cube made from mirrors floating in a landscape, it reflects you and your surroundings across six different planes. By peering into it, you begin view identity and place in novel ways.” The show’s participants interact with the world in a similar fashion, reflecting, filtering and distorting their varied contexts to create visions of the world that are requisitely imbued with their own experiences.

Photographer Emily Mason makes images of her surroundings, collages them onto sculptural props, and photographs the finished assemblages to create images that flicker between dimensionality and abstraction. Painter Nate Masse creates layered figurative compositions that compress visual details from multiple moments into a single, sensuous image. Sculptor Julie Slattery shapes talismanic objects—in this case, enormous bird skulls—that become emotional reliquaries for specific events in her life.

“The artworks and zines are mapping out this ‘complete picture’ of an experience,” says Gill. “We’re asserting that fully realized artistic expression can communicate something truer than, say, a hasty smartphone snapshot of a particular person or place.” In an increasingly polarized world, it’s a radical act of empathy to dive through the looking glass.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, 2/23, 5-8 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Curator & Artist Talk: Saturday, 3/17, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Zine Reading: Saturday, 4/7, 3-4 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Performance by Emmaly Wiederholt: Saturday, 4/14, 7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
$5-$25 suggested donation for closing performance.

Art

Kevin Bond, Derek Chan, Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill, Erin Gould, Julia Haywood, Chaz John, Kat Kinnick, Shannon Latham, Ariana Lombardi, Emily Mason, Nate Massé, Drew MC, David O’Brien, Josh Palmeri, Sarah Palmeri, Alicia Piller, Julie Slattery, Dion Valdez, Emmaly Wiederholt, Ona Yopack

Zines

Liz Brindley, Caryn Crimmel, Jordan Eddy, Pascal Emmer, Jess Haring, Katie Johnson, Israel Francisco Haros Lopez, Amanda Malloy & David McCarty, Erin Mickelson, Erica Nguyen, Yvette Serrano & Ryan Dennison, Bucket Siler, Emmaly Wiederholt, Rachelle Woods, Michael Wilson

Featured Image: Nate Masse, On Polyamory (detail), mixed media, 57.5 x 55″, 2013-2018

Preview: Mirror Box | Strangers Collective

Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill and Jordan Eddy, co-directors of Strangers Collective and the No Land art space, curate this exhibition of emerging artists and writers at form & concept. The show represents a network of early career creatives, starting in Santa Fe and spiraling across the nation. Its curatorial throughline presents a radical method for reflecting on place and identity through art objects. Mirror Box opens at form & concept on Friday, February 23 from 5 to 8 pm.

“The central mission of Strangers Collective has always been to pry open wall space for emerging artists in Santa Fe’s highly competitive market,” says Farrell. “Mirror Box is a culmination of our efforts.” Strangers Collective’s past pop-up group exhibitions, spanning summer 2014 through winter 2017, appeared in diverse venues including ART.i.factory Gallery, Santa Fe Community Gallery and Center for Contemporary Arts. “In spring of 2017, we founded No Land, which is a small space on the Plaza where we curate solo exhibitions for emerging artists,” says Strangers co-director Jordan Eddy. “We found ourselves in a solid place to make another big, definitive curatorial statement, but needed a bigger venue to do it.” form & concept, where Eddy works as marketing manager by day, offered up its sprawling top floor galleries for the show.

Kevin Bond Photography- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kevin Bond, Reminiscences Safelight, photo transfer on safelight, 16.5 x 11.5 x 9 in., 2016.

“I was excited to set the stage for this Strangers show, because I’ve seen the project expand and contract to fit so many spaces and compelling stories,” says form & concept Gallery Director Frank Rose. “form & concept often shows emerging artists, so it made perfect sense to align our efforts and strengthen the web.” Farrell, Eddy and Gill have been working on the show for over ten months, conducting in-person studio visits in Santa Fe, Albuquerque and Denver, and virtual check-ins with artists in Arizona, California, Oregon, New York, Japan and South Korea. “The collective is New Mexico-based, but our geographic range has grown as people move around to other art communities across the country,” says Gill. “Reuniting everyone for this exhibition showed us that there are still remarkably strong links between the concepts the artists are exploring.”

The term “mirror box” originates in the medical field: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran invented the box with two back-to-back mirrors in the center to help amputees manage phantom limb pain. The patient places the “good” limb into one side, and the “residual” limb into the other, making mirrored movements that can trick the brain into believing that it’s moving the phantom limb. “It’s a tribute to the incredible power of grey matter,” says Eddy. “If our minds are capable of conjuring a nervous system from thin air, can we link up with people, places or things in the same visceral but invisible way?” The curatorial team realized that art, like the mirror box, can act as a conduit for this type of transcendent—but also highly tangible—experience.

Julie Slattery Sculpture- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Julie Slattery, Bird Skull series, bronze, 5 x 2.5 x3 in. (large), 3.5 x 2 x 2 in. (small), 2018.

“As we turned over the idea of a ‘mirror box’ in conversation, its meaning evolved to represent a sort of theoretical art object,” says Farrell. “If you imagine a cube made from mirrors floating in a landscape, it reflects you and your surroundings across six different planes. By peering into it, you begin view identity and place in novel ways.” The show’s participants interact with the world in a similar fashion, reflecting, filtering and distorting their varied contexts to create visions of the world that are requisitely imbued with their own experiences.

“The artworks and zines are mapping out this ‘complete picture’ of an experience,” says Gill. “We’re asserting that fully realized artistic expression can communicate something truer than, say, a hasty smartphone snapshot of a particular person or place.” In an increasingly polarized world, it’s a radical act of empathy to dive through the looking glass.

Follow Strangers Collective on Instagram and Facebook for behind-the-scenes photos and stories from the curatorial process, and RSVP for Mirror Box at the link below.

Learn more about this exhibition.
RSVP on Facebook.

Alicia Piller Artwork- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Alicia Piller, Heart Flow, mixed media, 82 x 12 x 2.5 in., 2015.

Art

Kevin Bond, Derek Chan, Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill, Erin Gould, Julia Haywood, Chaz John, Kat Kinnick, Shannon Latham, Ariana Lombardi, Emily Mason, Nate Masse, Drew MC, David O’Brien, Josh Palmeri, Sarah Palmeri, Alicia Piller, Julie Slattery, Stephanie Thompson, Dion Valdez, Emmaly Wiederholt, Ona Yopack

Zines

Liz Brindley, Caryn Crimmel, Melissa Dow, Jordan Eddy, Juro Gagne, Jess Haring, Katie Johnson, Israel Francisco Haros Lopez, Amanda Malloy & David McCarty, Erin Mickelson, Erica Nguyen, Yvette Serrano, Bucket Siler, Stephanie Thompson, Charlotte Thurman, Emmaly Wiederholt, Rachelle Woods, Michael Wilson

Derek Chan Artwork- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Derek Chan, Mercury in Retrograde, acrylic, silver leaf and collage on panel, 72 x 48 in., 2013. Photo by Jose Rivera.

This Friday: Strangers Collective & Ford / Forlano

Alicia Piller Sculpture- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Alicia Piller, Celestial Body (detail), leather, mixed media, 50 x 17 x 17 in., 2014.

Opening
Strangers Collective
MIRROR BOX

February 23 – April 14, 2018

Opening Reception: Friday, February 23, 5-8 pm

Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill and Jordan Eddy, co-directors of Strangers Collective and the No Land art space, curate this exhibition of emerging artists and writers. The term “mirror box” originates in the medical field: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran invented the box with two back-to-back mirrors in the center to help amputees manage phantom limb pain. The patient places the “good” limb into one side, and the “residual” limb into the other, making mirrored movements that can trick the brain into believing that it’s moving the phantom limb. “It’s a tribute to the incredible power of grey matter,” says Eddy. “If our minds are capable of conjuring a nervous system from thin air, can we link up with people, places or things in the same visceral but invisible way?” The curatorial team realized that art, like the mirror box, can act as a conduit for this type of transcendent—but also highly tangible—experience.

Learn more about this exhibition.
RSVP on Facebook.

Ford / Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Hydro Brooch #422, polymer, sterling silver, gold leaf.

Special Reception
Introducing Ford / Forlano

Friday, February 23, 5-8 pm

“The conversation is in every piece,” says David Forlano. “The input is the journey.” He and Steven Ford have collaborated for nearly four decades under the moniker Ford / Forlano, creating wearable artworks from polymer clay, sterling silver, gold leaf and many other materials. Over the years, their designs have undergone a spectacular evolution—as has the nature of their working relationship. Forlano moved to Santa Fe in 2005, putting almost 2,000 miles between the longtime collaborators. “It has actually made the work more dynamic, with an even bigger range,” Ford says. form & concept presents Introducing Ford / Forlano, featuring the artistic duo’s latest work.

Learn more about this event.
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Last Look: Thais Mather’s Reckless Abandon

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Exhibition- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Installation view of Thais Mather: Reckless Abandon. Photo by Kara Duval.

As Thais Mather’s critically acclaimed solo exhibition Reckless Abandon approaches its closing date, join her for a final public engagement on Friday, February 2 from 5 to 7 pm. The Magazine just published a fantastic review of the show by Diane Armitage in their February/March relaunch issue. Here’s an excerpt:

There are many threads to follow in Reckless Abandon: from images of Stone Age fertility goddesses; to the Walpurgisnacht, or Witches’ Sabbath, a performance of hellish and deafening heavy metal music played in a cave-like room and accompanying a video of fire projected on a large bowl of water; to the life-size wooden figure of a woman burnt from head to toe. This latter sculpture, Mine and Thine, along with the charred bust Thaumaturge, (a miracle worker or a magician), are the two most powerful works in Mather’s exhibition. The presence of the blackened figure, laid out as if on a burial slab, sucks all the energy out of the room it was installed in, just as it was intended to do. It’s a timeless reminder that women, along with men, are due for a ritual funeral pyre whereby the darkest aspects of our collective history are dematerialized and transformed into a more enlightened chapter of human behavior in the evolution of consciousness. How else can the phoenix rise from the oppressive ashes of history and say, “I can just leave you… Now I can just fly away”?

Read the rest of the review here, and come see Reckless Abandon at the closing reception tonight. The exhibition officially ends on February 10.

Learn more about this exhibition.
RSVP for the closing reception on Facebook.

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Exhibition- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Exhibition- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Exhibition- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Exhibition- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Show- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Thais Mather- Reckless Abandon Exhibition- Diane Armitage Review- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Photos by Kara Duval. Browse Thais Mather’s artwork here.

Closing Reception: Thais Mather | Reckless Abandon

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As Thais Mather’s critically acclaimed solo exhibition Reckless Abandon approaches its closing date, join her for a final public engagement on Friday, February 2 from 5 to 7 pm. Light refreshments will be served. Reckless Abandon runs through February 10, 2018.

“I think people are getting these catastrophic feelings, that this is the end,” says Thais Mather. “I don’t believe in that. I think this is a beginning.” The feminist artist’s new exhibition, Reckless Abandon, comes at a time of cultural, political and environmental upheaval. It’s an ideal moment to examine human history from a revolutionary stance—and present urgent questions that can reveal a new path forward. Through a monumental art installation and an interconnected series of performances and events, Mather will challenge viewers to abandon patriarchal structures in favor of a transcendent vision for humanity.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Reckless Abandon Events

Opening Reception | Friday, November 24, 2017 from 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: A Reading | Saturday, November 25, 2-3 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: Performance | Friday, December 15, 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook
A Day of Ritual Prayer Performance | Saturday, January 20, 7 am-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook
Reckless Abandon: Closing Reception | Friday, February 2, 5-7 pm — RSVP on Facebook