Artist Talk: Jaydan Moore | Dust

RSVP on Facebook.

Join Jaydan Moore for an artist talk at form & concept on Saturday, June 30 from 2 to 3 pm. He discusses his solo exhibition Dust, featuring sculptures made from found, silver-plated tableware, and intaglio prints. Moore appears at the artist talk on Saturday, June 30 from 2 to 3 pm. The show opens with a reception on Friday, June 29, 5 to 7 pm.

Moore comes from a long line of California tombstone carvers, which might explain his obsession with the concept of commemoration. “The trade goes back four generations,” says the Virginia artist. “I grew up watching people make accommodations for loved ones, and turn their history into an object.” About six years ago, Moore began collecting silver-plated tableware to use as a raw material for intricate sculptures. By reshaping these culturally loaded objects, he turned them into vessels for his ideas about memory and material culture. In a new solo exhibition at form & concept, Moore manipulates scrap metal from previous artistic experiments to flip his conceptual universe on its head. “What are the stages of forgetting?” he asks.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts

RSVP on Facebook.

We’re honored to announce that internationally renowned jewelry designers Robin Waynee and Ryan Roberts are form & concept’s newest represented artists. The couple has worked side-by-side since 1997, and though they strongly influence each other, they maintain separate practices and bodies of work. They’ll present new designs at the special event Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm.

Robin Waynee

Robin Waynee learned at an early age how creativity and hard work can lead to fulfillment. A member of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, Robin was born and raised in Mio, Michigan along with six siblings. Following her family to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1991, and continuing to work in the family business of custom furniture making, Robin began designing her own pieces and pursued woodworking for several years.

After meeting local jeweler Ryan Roberts in 1997, Robin became inspired by his work and discovered a burning desire to create jewelry. Her wide range of jewelry styles, creative choices of precious stone and metal combinations and anodizing schemes, along with her careful selection of quality materials and attention to detail make Robin’s jewelry highly sought after by the discriminating collector and devotee of exclusive fine jewelry.

Browse Robin’s work.

Ryan Roberts

Born in the small village of Chimayo in Northern New Mexico, Ryan was raised in a family in which almost everyone is an artist. When he was a young teen, Ryan lived in Hawaii for a year, where he spent time with his aunt Gayle Bright, a talented sculptor and jewelry designer. Seeing the skill and care with which she made her art inspired him, and he began to cultivate a love and appreciation of jewelry making which would lead him to his life work.

Upon returning home to New Mexico, just after his 16th birthday, Ryan secured an apprenticeship at a local jeweler’s studio. By the age of 19, Ryan was hired by one of Santa Fe’s most talented local jewelers, Mario Chavez. In this environment, the young artist was exposed to an expanded array of complex tools and techniques. Ryan’s reputation grew as one of the finest jewelers in Santa Fe. Later, Ryan met the only person he had ever taken as an apprentice: his future wife, Robin Waynee. The two would both go on to become interationally celebrated jewelers.

Browse Ryan’s work.

Curator’s Selection: Eric William Carroll | Inner Orbit

Our director Frank Rose spent months on a national search for artists who explore personal or cultural visions of outer space in their work. The resulting exhibition, Inner Orbit, presents the cosmos not as a dark void, but as a densely layered cultural landscape. We asked Frank to discuss two of the artists who appear in the show for a new video series called Curator’s Selection. First up is St. Paul-based artist Eric William Carroll, who contributed several works from his Standard Stars series to Inner Orbit. Watch the video above for Frank’s take, and read Eric’s thoughts on the body of work below.

From Eric:

My project Standard Stars draws from three years of research at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), located an hour outside of Asheville, North Carolina in the small town of Rosman, and surrounded by the Pisgah National Forest.

One of PARI’s missions is to collect and digitize the largest archive of astronomical glass-plate photographs, known as the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive, commonly referred to as APDA. Currently, APDA is a collection of over 200,000 public-domain glass plate negatives that have been acquired from institutions and individuals all over the world. The visual wealth of APDA is unparalleled, as it documents the history of photographing the sky from the late 1800’s until the end of the 20th century on a now obsolete medium. There is an undeniable physical beauty to these photographic objects, which explains why I have made many trips over the years to immerse myself in the collection.

With just over 1% of the archive scanned, most of the photographic plates sit in boxes and on shelves, slowly deteriorating. The emulsion peels off of the glass plate in a variety of patterns, as if nature is trying to creep back into these scientific studies. In these images I have carefully composed the flakes of emulsion and photographed them on a light table and then inverted the image. In some cases, such as NA8302, the astronomer accidentally spilled oil on the plate. In NA8075, the exposed plate wasn’t processed in enough developer solution. These errors bridge the gap between galaxy and astronomer.

All in all, I have made high-resolution scans and photographs of over 500 plates from APDA. Visually and metaphorically, APDA represents the human attempt to study, represent, and organize the Universe. The fact that this collection is in danger of disintegrating and being forgotten is sadly and beautifully poetic.

Click here to browse the complete Inner Orbit exhibition on our website. The show appears in conjunction with Santa Fe Futurition, the Currents New Media Festival, and the Santa Fe Institute’s Interplanetary Festival.

Listen and be moved.

Nathan Wheeler- Peformance Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

form & concept has two events lined up for the weekend, and they’re not to be missed! Tonight is the closing reception for Debra Baxter’s solo exhibition Tooth & Nail (Friday, 6/15, 5-7 pm). On Saturday, we’re hosting Nathan Wheeler for an experimental music and performance piece among the artworks of Inner Orbit (Saturday, 6/16, 7-8:30 pm). Alex De Vore of Santa Fe Reporter chose Nathan’s event as a calendar pick this week. Here’s an excerpt:

Ever heard of an EMF meter? They’re those gadgets that detect electromagnetic fields or, in some cases, psychic energy and possibly ghosts. Spooky, right? But don’t be scared; New York-based multi-disciplinary artist and dancer Nathan Wheeler plans to use them for a non-spooky event.

Nathan Wheeler- Peformance Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Paul Weideman covered the performance in this week’s Pasatiempo. Here’s an excerpt:

Wheeler embarks on a communal experience with living people and perhaps with some more ethereal collaborators. One of his chief tools in this process is an instrument that can sense electromagnetic fields (EMFs). “We’ll all be sitting in a space, but basically what I’m doing is using ghost-detection circuits [EMF meters] to read the different sort of invisible energies that are in the space,” said the artist, who is known for his improvisational music and dance performances. “These circuits do things like detect electromagnetic interference and static electricity, but they also are supposed to detect ghosts.”

Learn more about both events in this blog post. We’ll see you this weekend!

Closing Reception: Debra Baxter | Tooth & Nail

RSVP on Facebook.

Join Debra Baxter for a last look at her solo exhibition Tooth & Nail at this closing reception on Friday, June 15 from 5 to 7 pm. The show officially closes on June 16, 2018.

Baxter frequently picks up materials she’s never used before, searching for novel ways to engage the histories of sculpture, jewelry, weaponry or drapery. For Tooth & Nail, the events of the #MeToo movement have fed into her continued interest in the strength, vulnerability and the raw power of the female voice. The courage of these women has activated work with a blend of toughness and vulnerability. “These contrasting materials carry a similar spirit,” she explains. “My sculptures sometimes look delicate, but when they’re finished, they are structurally resilient.”

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception | Friday, April 27, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk | Saturday, May 19, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Reception | Saturday, June 15, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook

Meet Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts.

Ryan Roberts- Robin Waynee- Jewelry Designers- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New MexicoWe’re honored to announce that internationally renowned jewelry designers Robin Waynee and Ryan Roberts are form & concept’s newest represented artists. The couple has worked side-by-side since 1997, and though they strongly influence each other, they maintain separate practices and bodies of work. They’ll present new designs at the special event Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm. Look below to learn more about Robin and Ryan, and browse their work. Make sure to RSVP on Facebook for further updates on their reception.

Robin Waynee

Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Rolling Pearl Ring, 18k gold, pearl, sapphire, diamond.

Robin Waynee learned at an early age how creativity and hard work can lead to fulfillment. A member of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, Robin was born and raised in Mio, Michigan along with six siblings. Following her family to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1991, and continuing to work in the family business of custom furniture making, Robin began designing her own pieces and pursued woodworking for several years.

After meeting local jeweler Ryan Roberts in 1997, Robin became inspired by his work and discovered a burning desire to create jewelry. Her wide range of jewelry styles, creative choices of precious stone and metal combinations and anodizing schemes, along with her careful selection of quality materials and attention to detail make Robin’s jewelry highly sought after by the discriminating collector and devotee of exclusive fine jewelry.

Browse all of Robin’s work.

Robin Waynee Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Blue Chalcedony Cuff Bracelet, sterling silver, 18k gold, blue chalcedony, pink sapphire, diamond.
Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Gold & Diamond Stackable Ring, 18k gold, diamond.
Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Blue Chalcedony Ring, 18k gold, blue chalcedony, diamond.
Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Chalcedony & Rhodolite Pendant, 18k gold, blue chalcedony, rhodolite garnet, diamond.

Ryan Roberts

Ryan Roberts- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ryan Roberts, Platinum & Rubellite Tourmaline Ring, platinum, rubellite tourmaline, tsavorite, diamond.

Born in the small village of Chimayo in Northern New Mexico, Ryan Roberts was raised in a family in which almost everyone is an artist. When he was a young teen, Ryan lived in Hawaii for a year, where he spent time with his aunt Gayle Bright, a talented sculptor and jewelry designer. Seeing the skill and care with which she made her art inspired him, and he began to cultivate a love and appreciation of jewelry making which would lead him to his life work.

Upon returning home to New Mexico, just after his 16th birthday, Ryan secured an apprenticeship at a local jeweler’s studio. By the age of 19, Ryan was hired by one of Santa Fe’s most talented local jewelers, Mario Chavez. In this environment, the young artist was exposed to an expanded array of complex tools and techniques. Ryan’s reputation grew as one of the finest jewelers in Santa Fe. Later, Ryan met the only person he had ever taken as an apprentice: his future wife, Robin Waynee. The two would both go on to become internationally celebrated jewelers.

Browse all of Ryan’s work.

Ryan Roberts- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ryan Roberts, Chrysocolla Gem Silica Ring, 18k gold, gem silica, tsavorite, diamond.
Ryan Roberts- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ryan Roberts, Rubellite Tourmaline Ring, 18k gold, rubellite tourmaline, diamond, tsavorite, amethyst.

form & concept @ ABQ Museum.

Albuquerque Museum- American Jewelry from New Mexico- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Albuquerque Museum’s new exhibition American Jewelry from New Mexico, opening June 2, features over 300 spectacular objects that span prehistory to the present. We’re pleased to announce that six of our represented jewelers appear in this immense show: Robert Ebendorf, Debra Baxter, Robin Waynee, Ryan Roberts, and Steven Ford & David Forlano of Ford / Forlano.

“The 2,000-year history of jewelry in New Mexico incorporates everything from bottle caps to diamonds,” wrote Albuquerque Journal of the exhibition. “Some of the most important American designers and makers of contemporary jewelry live and work here.” Look below to see the works by form & concept artists that appear in the show, with links to their work in the form & concept collection.

Ford / Forlano Designers- American Jewelry from New Mexico Exhibition- Albuquerque Museum

Ford / Forlano.

see more.

Designer Robert Ebendorf- American Jewelry from New Mexico- Albuquerque Museum

Robert Ebendorf.

see more.

Designer Robin Waynee- American Jewelry from New Mexico- Albuquerque Museum

Robin Waynee.

see more.

Designer Ryan Roberts- American Jewelry from New Mexico- Albuquerque Museum

Ryan Roberts.

see more.

Designer Debra Baxter- American Jewelry in New Mexico- Albuquerque Museum

Debra Baxter.

see more.

Preview: Inner Orbit

Artist Matthew Mullins- Inner Orbit Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Matthew Mullins, The Sun In Our Bones, oil on linen, 48 x 48 in., 2018.

From a human perspective, the night sky is a densely layered cultural landscape. Long before they were subjects of scientific study, stars were laden with countless overlapping mythologies. Fortune tellers, sailors, writers, architects and artists have all projected profound meaning into the cosmos, tying earthly events to the movements of heavenly bodies.

form & concept is pleased to present Inner Orbit, a group exhibition of contemporary artists who carry forward this grand tradition. They meld fine art and craft mediums with technology to create personal or cultural visions of the firmament. Inner Orbit opens on Friday, May 25 from 5 to 7 pm, as part of form & concept’s Second Anniversary CelebrationSome of the artists will appear at a gallery talk on Saturday, June 9 from 2 to 3 pm.

Artist Marcus Zuniga- Inner Orbit Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Marcus Zúñiga, lines (detail), 2017, mural, led string lights, marker, dimensions vary.

Under the banner of Santa Fe Futurition, a number of local cultural institutions have banded together to present forward-thinking programming throughout the month of June. There’s the Currents New Media Festival (June 8-24) and Santa Fe Institute’s Interplanetary Festival (June 7-8), both in the Santa Fe Railyard, along with exhibitions and events presented by Meow Wolf, Axle Contemporary and the Thoma Foundation’s Art House.

“The Railyard will anchor a complete solar system of tech and science-themed exhibitions and events next month,” says form & concept Gallery Director Frank Rose. “We’re kicking things off at the end of May with a show that presents outer space not as a dark void, but as a rich source of artistic inspiration.”

 

Artist Case Jernigan- Inner Orbit Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Case Jernigan, Aliens and Boats at Muni, paper, canvas, thread, LED lights, 21 x 25 in.

 

Inner Orbit stands out as the first entry in Futurition’s formidable lineup—and also as perhaps its most down-to-earth program. During the curatorial process, Rose sought out artists who view outer space as an enormous cultural mirror.

Painter Katie Dorame recasts space aliens as European colonizers descending upon the Americas. New media artist Andrew Yang presents a two-channel video titled Interviews with the Milky Way, which weaves together cosmic imagery with sound bites from conversations about the stars. In a series of densely detailed graphite drawings, Nina Elder examines the history of meteorites stolen from Indigenous lands by the United States government. Artist duo Hillerbrand + Magsamen contribute portraits of their family in spacesuits, à la Lost in Space.

“These artists work with their hands as much as they’re using computers,” says Rose. “They’re blending technology with other, more analog artistic mediums to tell powerful stories.” 

Learn more on our website.
RSVP on Facebook.

Artist Eric William Carroll- Inner Orbit Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Eric William Carroll, NA7997, 1/23/99 (from the series “Standard Stars”), photopolymer gravure, 14 x 11 in., AP 1/5, 2017.

Preview: Erika Lynne Hanson

Erika Lynne Hanson- Textile and New Media Artist- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Erika Lynne Hanson, Movement Choir: Green River, site specific installation, 2017.

The White Sands Missile Range is a world-famous site of military bomb testing, but its recent history is tied to an isolated village 600 miles to the north. For ten years during the Cold War, Green River, Utah was the launch site for test missiles that detonated in White Sands. That’s the reason Arizona artist Erika Lynne Hanson landed there for a month-long research project in 2017.

Hanson’s time in Green River marked the start of a major body of work regarding the scraps from the missile tests. In a new series of weavings and video artworks, Hanson uses a little-known language to inspire nuanced perspectives on these sites. Her artworks pose open questions about the nature of humanity and our relationship to nature. Movement Choir: Landscape Scores opens at form & concept on Friday, May 25 from 5 to 7 pm, and runs through June 23, 2018. Hanson will conduct an artist talk on Saturday, May 26 from 2 to 3 pm.

“Green River was the stage for a fascinating chapter in American history,” says Hanson. “We were quite literally bombing ourselves for a ten-year span.” During her stay in Green River, Hanson became fascinated with the considerable marks—both psychological and physical—that the project left on the community and its surroundings. “These parts of the missile would fall off and land in the landscape, leaving behind scars,” she says. Hanson researched the sites of this accidental jestam. She returned to her loom with a challenge: how to explore the significance of these unintentional land artworks through fiber?

Erika Lynne Hanson- Textile and New Media Artist- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Erika Lynne Hanson, Landscape: 3, woven and dyed wool, 31 x 55 in., 2018.

Hanson is accustomed to tackling creative projects that span many miles and artistic mediums. She’s an Assistant Professor of Fibers and Socially Engaged Practice at Arizona State University, and also maintains a multidisciplinary artistic practice that has taken her from Alaska to Iceland. Broadly, her artworks propose potential connections between material, history and place. Recently that has manifested in a series of imagined dialogues between humans and different elements of the landscape. Before her Green River excursion, Hanson completed a project in White Sands, New Mexico where she planted gypsum-colored flags as tributes to the land.

“The idea is to say, ‘I will weave a flag in your honor, and then we will have a conversation,’” Hanson explains. “It’s a funny proposition to think that a human can broker a dialogue between, say, a gypsum crystal and the White Sands dunes. It never totally works, so it becomes an absurdist proposition. I’m in this landscape, I don’t fully understand it, but I’m going to try.” Flags appear in Hanson’s body of work for Movement Choir: Landscape Scores as well, though they’re more than just offerings.

Erika Lynne Hanson- Textile and New Media Artist- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Erika Lynne Hanson, a layered score: 1, woven and dyed wool, 20 x 20 in., 2018.

To incorporate the story of the missile fragments into the work, the artist turned her banners into semaphores of sorts. She used the Labanotation system, invented by 20th century choreographer Rudolf Laban for dance performance scores, to indicate how the viewer might move their body through each site. Video artworks of Hanson planting the flags will also appear in the show. “By suggesting how the body might move through these spaces, I’m proposing potential connections amongst material, history, and place,” the artist says.

After all, Hanson points out, the places that were in the paths of the missiles were hardly empty. “They picked Green River to deploy these missiles because they said it went over the least amount of inhabited lands to reach White Sands,” she says. “It goes over all of this National Park and BLM land, so it’s not really uninhabited, it’s just uninhabited by people.” If the landscape could speak, Hanson wonders if it would complain about these rusty thorns in its side. “Is it a trauma when the landscape is hit with a missile?” she asks. “What does a rock care, or does it care? Maybe I’m just reflecting my mortality into this, which is a very short span in the face of geologic time.”

Learn more on about this exhibition.
RSVP on Facebook.

THIS FRIDAY: Inner Orbit & Erika Lynne Hanson

Two exhibitions debut at form & concept on Friday, as part of our Second Anniversary Celebration! Learn more about them below, and make sure to RSVP for the party on Facebook.

Hillerbrand + Magsamen- Higher Ground Photograph- Inner Orbit Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Exhibition

Inner Orbit

Opening Reception: Friday, May 25, 5-7 pm
Artist Talk: Saturday, June 9, 2-3 pm

From a human perspective, the night sky is a densely layered cultural landscape. Long before they were subjects of scientific study, stars were laden with countless overlapping mythologies. Fortune tellers, sailors, writers, architects and artists have all projected profound meaning into the cosmos—tying earthly events to the movements of heavenly bodies. Inner Orbit spotlights contemporary artists with personal or cultural visions of outer space. Many of the featured artists meld fine art and craft mediums with technology for a fresh look at the firmament.

Learn more on our website.
RSVP on Facebook.

Above: Hillerbrand + Magsamen, Higher Ground- Family, archival inkjet print, 2015.

Erika Lynne Hanson- Movement Choir- Site Specific Installation- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Exhibition

Erika Lynne Hanson

Movement Choir: Landscape Scores

Opening Reception: Friday, May 25, 5-7 pm
Artist Talk: Saturday, May 26, 2-3 pm

Arizona artist Erika Lynne Hanson weaves a hidden history of the Southwest into her solo exhibition Movement Choir: Landscape Scores. Using a coded language in her fiber and new media artworks, Hanson charts the paths of Cold War missile tests from Green River, Utah to White Sands, New Mexico. The rusty remnants, scattered over more than 600 miles of desert, represent open questions about the nature of humanity and our relationship to nature.

Learn more on our website.
RSVP on Facebook.

Above: Erika Lynne Hanson, Movement Choir: Green River, site specific installation, 2017.