Opening: Matthew Mullins | The Sun In Our Bones

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Santa Fe artist Matthew Mullins presents a solo exhibition of paintings, photographs and sculptures, inspired by the intrinsic links between humans and the natural world. Known for his mixed-media paintings that visually connect landscapes with human-made, geometric patterns, Mullins broadens his practice to encompass photography and sculpture. With this expanded artistic palette, he draws viewers across time and space—from a windswept patch of grass to the swirling cosmos.

The monumental body of work, which will fill form & concept’s ground floor, is united by patterns that repeat throughout the universe at infinite scales. The Sun in our Bones debuts on Friday, September 28 from 5 to 7 pm. Mullins will host an artist talk on Saturday, October 20 from 2 to 3 pm and closing reception on Saturday, November 17 from 5 to 7 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 20, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Closing Reception: Saturday, November 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening: form & concept Annual Exhibition 2018

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form & concept’s represented artists come together for this dynamic group exhibition. form & concept Annual Exhibition 2018 is a showcase for each artist’s latest work, and a collective expression of the gallery’s overarching mission. Since its founding in May 2016, form & concept has added ten artists to its official roster. They maintain cross-disciplinary practices that contribute to the gallery’s creative conversation about the intersections between art, craft and design. form & concept Annual Exhibition 2018 opens Friday, July 27, 5-7 pm, and runs through September 15, 2018. A number of the featured artists will conduct a gallery talk on Saturday, August 25 from 2 to 3 pm.

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Opening: Jaydan Moore | Dust

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Virginia artist Jaydan Moore is known for his sculptures made from found, silver-plated tableware. After six years of manipulating these lost heirlooms to reflect on memory and commemoration, he’s accumulated thousands of scrap metal fragments. In his solo exhibition Dust, Moore incorporates the shards into a new series of sculptures. Through these palimpsests and an array of intaglio prints, the artist explores the slow deterioration of memory. Dust opens on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm, with an artist talk on Saturday, June 30 from 2 to 3 pm.

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Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts

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We’re honored to announce that internationally renowned jewelry designers Robin Waynee and Ryan Roberts are form & concept’s newest represented artists. The couple has worked side-by-side since 1997, and though they strongly influence each other, they maintain separate practices and bodies of work. They’ll present new designs at the special event Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm.

Robin Waynee

Robin Waynee learned at an early age how creativity and hard work can lead to fulfillment. A member of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, Robin was born and raised in Mio, Michigan along with six siblings. Following her family to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1991, and continuing to work in the family business of custom furniture making, Robin began designing her own pieces and pursued woodworking for several years.

After meeting local jeweler Ryan Roberts in 1997, Robin became inspired by his work and discovered a burning desire to create jewelry. Her wide range of jewelry styles, creative choices of precious stone and metal combinations and anodizing schemes, along with her careful selection of quality materials and attention to detail make Robin’s jewelry highly sought after by the discriminating collector and devotee of exclusive fine jewelry.

Browse Robin’s work.

Ryan Roberts

Born in the small village of Chimayo in Northern New Mexico, Ryan was raised in a family in which almost everyone is an artist. When he was a young teen, Ryan lived in Hawaii for a year, where he spent time with his aunt Gayle Bright, a talented sculptor and jewelry designer. Seeing the skill and care with which she made her art inspired him, and he began to cultivate a love and appreciation of jewelry making which would lead him to his life work.

Upon returning home to New Mexico, just after his 16th birthday, Ryan secured an apprenticeship at a local jeweler’s studio. By the age of 19, Ryan was hired by one of Santa Fe’s most talented local jewelers, Mario Chavez. In this environment, the young artist was exposed to an expanded array of complex tools and techniques. Ryan’s reputation grew as one of the finest jewelers in Santa Fe. Later, Ryan met the only person he had ever taken as an apprentice: his future wife, Robin Waynee. The two would both go on to become interationally celebrated jewelers.

Browse Ryan’s work.

Opening: Inner Orbit

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form & concept presents Inner Orbit, an exhibition of contemporary artists from across the United States with deeply personal or cultural visions of outer space. The show appears in conjunction with Santa Fe Futurition, the Currents New Media Festival, and the Santa Fe Institute’s Interplanetary Festival. Inner Orbit opens on Friday, May 25, 5-7 pm, and a number of the participating artists will appear at a gallery talk on Saturday, June 9, 2-3 pm.

From a human perspective, the night sky is a densely layered cultural landscape. Long before they were subjects of scientific study, stars were laden with countless overlapping mythologies. Fortune tellers, sailors, writers, architects and artists have all projected profound meaning into the cosmos—tying earthly events to the movements of heavenly bodies. Inner Orbit spotlights contemporary artists who meld fine art and craft mediums with technology for a fresh look at the firmament.

Artists

Katie Dorame, Nina Elder, Stephan Hillerbrand, Case Jernigan, Drew Lenihan, Mary Magsamen, Matthew Mullins, Eric William Carroll, Andrew Yang, Marcus Zúñiga

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Image: Case Jernigan, Aliens and Boats at Muni (detail), paper, canvas, thread, LED lights, 21×25 inches, 2017

Opening: Debra Baxter | Tooth & Nail

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“This thing could fail, and it could be a nightmare,” says Debra Baxter. “But who cares?” The Santa Fe sculptor makes artworks that combine divergent materials—metal, glass and stone, for example—so there’s always a risk that they’ll split apart during the creative process. Informed by her passion for armor and weaponry, Baxter charges ahead fearlessly to create elegant and sometimes dangerous objects. Her new solo exhibition at form & concept, Tooth & Nail, includes flowing bronze breastplates that hold glittering minerals, and metal throwing stars that are cast from lace. There’s also a wicked bronze-and-quartz sculpture from her Smithsonian-collected brass knuckles series. “I’ll often emerge from these crazy material experiments bruised—but I’m never broken,” says Baxter. 

Baxter’s solo exhibition Tooth & Nail opens on Friday, April 27 from 5 to 7 pm, and runs through June 16, 2018. Baxter will conduct an artist talk on Saturday, May 19 from 2 to 3 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception | Friday, April 27, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk | Saturday, May 19, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Reception | Saturday, June 15, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook

Opening: Matthew Szösz | Minimal Tension

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For Matthew Szösz, setting up just one glass art experiment is an involved process. The preparation takes half a workday in some cases, and up to four weeks in others. It all leads to that pivotal moment, when the sculpture either takes its final shape or shatters into a million pieces. The Seattle-based artist has repeated this process countless times—with about 75% of his work instantly collapsing into rubble. This spirit of fearless experimentation is reflected in his dazzlingly innovative, award-winning oeuvre.

Szösz debuts new works from two of his ongoing series, Inflatables and Ropework, in his solo exhibition Minimal Tension. The show opens at form & concept on Friday, April 27 from 5 to 7 pm, coinciding with the opening reception for Debra Baxter: Tooth & Nail. Szösz conducts an artist talk on Saturday, April 28 from 2 to 3 pm, and the show runs through May 19, 2018.

Learn more about this exhibition.
Read an interview with Matthew Szösz.

Preview: Matthew Szösz | Minimal Tension

Matthew Szösz- Glass Sculpture- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Matthew Szösz, Ouroboros, fused glass, 24 x 24 x 14 in.

For Matthew Szösz, setting up just one glass art experiment is an involved process. The preparation takes half a workday in some cases, and up to four weeks in others. It all leads to that pivotal moment, when the sculpture either takes its final shape or shatters into a million pieces. The Seattle-based artist has repeated this process countless times—with about 75% of his work instantly collapsing into rubble.

This spirit of fearless experimentation is reflected in his dazzlingly innovative, award-winning oeuvre. Szösz debuts new works from two of his ongoing series, Inflatables and Ropework, in his solo exhibition Minimal Tension. The show opens at form & concept on Friday, April 27 from 5 to 7 pm, with an artist talk on Saturday, April 28 from 2 to 3 pm. It runs through May 19, 2018.

“I am something of an outsider in my practice—lacking traditional training in glass, and autodidactic in my use of the material,” says Szösz. After studying furniture design for his undergraduate degree, he entered the glass world as a studio assistant. “I was a mold maker and a hardware person and a tool maker, and I just kept getting traded from one glass artist to another,” he says. By the time he entered the graduate program at the Rhode Island School of Design in his early 30’s, he was more than prepared to break every rule he’d learned in glass studios. In pursuit of unique and dramatic sculptural forms, Szösz began dreaming up experiments that would push the material to its limits.

Matthew Szösz- Glass Sculpture- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Matthew Szösz, Floret, fused glass, 21 x 16 x 21 in.

“I had a professor who said, ‘no surprise for the artist, no surprise for the audience,’” Szösz says. “That surprise, where it’s as much a product of the material and circumstance that you set up as well as your own vision, is the thing that’s exciting for me.” He calls some of his experiments “material/process investigations” and others “bad ideas.” Either way, the key is to set up novel conditions in the studio, shifting heat, humidity and other variables to see how the glass responds. It’s a winding process—part scientific, part artistic—that has yielded significant treasures, such as Szösz’s Inflatables series.

Szösz builds the Inflatables using flat sheets of window glass, linking them together with tubes that channel air. He slips sheets of ceramic between the panes to keep the glass from fusing in certain places. The final step is to heat the piece to a molten state and blast air through the tubes, with the hope that it will inflate like a balloon but not burst. When he succeeds, Szösz emerges with a glass pod that resembles an enormous, clear chrysalis—or perhaps a lava monster’s pool toy. “There’s a certain amount of suspense and surprise,” Szösz explains. “When it actually does work, you get the idea that you’re working as a team with the material, kind of a partnership rather than just imposing your idea on something else.”

Matthew Szösz- Glass Sculpture- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Matthew Szösz, untitled (inflatable) no. 70b, fused and inflated glass, 10 x 8 x 8 in

The artist developed his Ropework series over the course of seven years. The project started as an attempt to capture the twisted, bulging lines of Japanese temple ropes called Shimenawa using glass fiber. “The exploration moved from the creation of glass fiber pulling machines to a re-purposing of industrial fibers, to studies of British Empire-era ropemaking and sailor knot tying culture to create the geometric forms currently produced as part of the series,” says Szösz.

Considering the breadth of his creative inquiries, it’s no surprise that Szösz has a full array of art world honors under his belt. He was an Emerging Artist-in-Residence at Pilchuck Glass School in 2007, and a Wheaton Fellow in 2008. In 2009 he was an artist-in-residence at Nagoya Institute for the Arts and taught a workshop at Toyama Glass Institute. Szösz won the 2009 Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award, becoming the second American ever to do so. In 2011 he was a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Grant Winner, and a year later he was selected by the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery as one of the top young craft artists in America for their exhibition 40 under 40.

“We’re particularly excited for Matthew’s artist talk on April 28, when we’ll show some videos of his process,” says form & concept Gallery Director Frank Rose. “Whether you’re a glass nerd or totally removed from that universe, you will marvel at how he brings these sculptures to life.”

Learn more about this exhibition.
RSVP for the opening reception.
RSVP for the artist talk.

This Friday: Strangers Collective & Ford / Forlano

Alicia Piller Sculpture- Mirror Box Exhibition- Strangers Collective- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Alicia Piller, Celestial Body (detail), leather, mixed media, 50 x 17 x 17 in., 2014.

Opening
Strangers Collective
MIRROR BOX

February 23 – April 14, 2018

Opening Reception: Friday, February 23, 5-8 pm

Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill and Jordan Eddy, co-directors of Strangers Collective and the No Land art space, curate this exhibition of emerging artists and writers. The term “mirror box” originates in the medical field: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran invented the box with two back-to-back mirrors in the center to help amputees manage phantom limb pain. The patient places the “good” limb into one side, and the “residual” limb into the other, making mirrored movements that can trick the brain into believing that it’s moving the phantom limb. “It’s a tribute to the incredible power of grey matter,” says Eddy. “If our minds are capable of conjuring a nervous system from thin air, can we link up with people, places or things in the same visceral but invisible way?” The curatorial team realized that art, like the mirror box, can act as a conduit for this type of transcendent—but also highly tangible—experience.

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Ford / Forlano Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ford / Forlano, Hydro Brooch #422, polymer, sterling silver, gold leaf.

Special Reception
Introducing Ford / Forlano

Friday, February 23, 5-8 pm

“The conversation is in every piece,” says David Forlano. “The input is the journey.” He and Steven Ford have collaborated for nearly four decades under the moniker Ford / Forlano, creating wearable artworks from polymer clay, sterling silver, gold leaf and many other materials. Over the years, their designs have undergone a spectacular evolution—as has the nature of their working relationship. Forlano moved to Santa Fe in 2005, putting almost 2,000 miles between the longtime collaborators. “It has actually made the work more dynamic, with an even bigger range,” Ford says. form & concept presents Introducing Ford / Forlano, featuring the artistic duo’s latest work.

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Artist Talk & Preview: Jodi Colella | Unidentified Women

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Jodi Colella leads a preview discussion of her solo exhibition Unidentified Women at form & concept.

It started somewhere among the vast archives of the Historic Northampton Museum in Northampton, Massachusetts. Fiber artist Jodi Colella was working on an art project inspired by the museum’s headwear collection, and she stumbled upon a series of daguerreotype portraits. “They were like little 19th century selfies,” Colella says. “I noticed that all the men in the images had every single detail of their life listed in the catalog. About 80% of the women were labeled ‘unidentified.’”

The artist was fascinated by these forgotten, female faces, and the contrast between the women’s fleeting social visibility and their invisibility to history. After hunting down similar portraits in flea markets and antique shops, Colella stitched intricate embroideries across the images, further obscuring the women’s identities. The body of work, titled Unidentified Women, makes its Santa Fe debut at form & concept on Friday, January 26 from 5-7 pm. Colella will appear at the opening reception, and also conduct an artist talk and preview on Thursday, January 25 from 2-3 pm.

Events 

Artist Talk & Preview: Thursday, January 25, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, January 26, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Learn more about this exhibition.