Artist Talk: Hand / Eye

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Join us for a interactive tour of the Hand/Eye group exhibition, featuring a number of the featured artists. Hand/Eye is an exhibition of ten artists from across the United States who merge photography and craft mediums. The artworks in the show incorporate a wide array of materials—fiber, cast glass, micaceous clay, human hair—that shatter the picture plane and push photographic imagery into the real world.

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It’s World Rhino Day!

Elana Schwartz, meditation on impermenance, form & concept, form and concept, santa fe gallery, rhino art, rhino sculpture, rhino, international rhino day, rhino, santa fe, new mexico gallery
Elana Schwartz, Meditation on Impermanence, bronze, 12 x 10.5 x 8.5 in. Available in two patinas.

September 22 is World Rhino Day! Just in time for the holiday, Elana Schwartz has completed a fantastical rhino sculpture in bronze. We’re donating 10% of the proceeds from the artwork’s sale to the International Rhino Foundation. Help save the rhinos, and add this stunning artwork to your collection.

Elana Schwartz, meditation on impermenance, form & concept, form and concept, santa fe gallery, rhino art, rhino sculpture, rhino, international rhino day, rhino, santa fe, new mexico gallery

“The Earth is on the verge of a mass extinction event,” said Schwartz. “Today, plants and animals on earth’s surface are becoming extinct at a faster rate than ever before. The corruption of earth’s shared natural resources informs us that humanity is inseparable from the rest the natural world and leads us the confront and thus act on the untimely impermanence of all existence.”

Elana Schwartz, meditation on impermenance, form & concept, form and concept, santa fe gallery, rhino art, rhino sculpture, rhino, international rhino day, rhino, santa fe, new mexico gallery

At the start of the 20th century, 500,000 rhinos roamed the earth. Today, only 29,500 rhinos survive in the wild. Learn more about the rhino crisis and how you can help here.

 

Spotlight: db/cb by Debra Baxter

Debra Baxter- db/cb Jewelry Line- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

“It’s all about having this vulnerability and turning it into power. The crystals stemmed from Superman’s crystalline Fortress of Solitude. It’s about the power of crystals in this kind of cartoony, comic book way—and then in reality, the various properties that people believe they have. They’re like mini shields.” 

Learn more about Debra Baxter’s db/cb jewelry line in our Q&A with the Santa Fe artist, and look below for new works from the ongoing series.

Debra Baxter- Rose Quartz Necklace- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Debra Baxter- Quartz Necklace- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Debra Baxter- Titanium Quartz Necklace- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Debra Baxter- Quartz Necklace- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Spotlight: Ceramics

Ceramic Art- Rachel Donner- Brian Giniewski- Susan Beiner- Form and Concept Shop- Santa Fe New Mexico

There’s a brand new array of charming ceramics in the form & concept shop. Rachel Donner‘s mugs, platters, and vases come in an array of fun colors and geometric forms. Brian Gienewski is a Philadelphia-based artist with a knack for creating oozing, colorful drips of glaze on cups, tumblers, and vases. When she isn’t making porcelain blooms, Susan Beiner crafts unique, eye-catching mugs with striking color combinations. Browse some of our favorite pieces below, and click the images to see more.

Rachel Donner- Ceramic Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Rachel Donner.

Brian Giniewski- Ceramic Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Brian Giniewski.

Susan Beiner- Ceramic Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Susan Beiner.

Design Spotlight: Kat Cole, Robert Ebendorf & more.

Robert Ebendorf- Handmade Found Object Jewelry- Fish Necklace- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

There’s new work in our gallery shop! You might recognize some familiar faces. Thais Mather recently re-imagined the 200,000 installation from her last solo exhibition with a series of four mask groups in the form & concept Annual ExhibitionRobert Ebendorf replenished his jewelry line with an eclectic collection of brooches, necklaces, and earrings. Snag them before they’re gone! Kat Cole sent us a fiery new necklace—as well as some chunky, industrial rings and brooches. Bunny Tobias is back with more Swarovski crystal and bronze clay creations. Bronze feathers, tourmaline, and undulating patterns are highlighted in this new line. See some of our favorites below, and click the images for more from each artist.

Thais Mather- Handmade Ceramic Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Thais Mather.

Robert Ebendorf- Handmade Found Object Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Robert Ebendorf.

Kat Cole- Handmade Enamel and Steel Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Kat Cole.

Bunny Tobias- Handmade Bronze Clay Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Bunny Tobias.

Press: American Jewelry from New Mexico

American Jewelry from New Mexico- Albuquerque Museum- Form & Concept Blog- Albuquerque New Mexico

Since we first blogged about Albuquerque Museum’s American Jewelry from New Mexico—which features six designers who show in the form & concept shop—there’s been quite a lot of press coverage on the exhibition. Kate Nelson of New Mexico Magazine wrote a blog post about the show when it opened in June. Here’s an excerpt:

From Spanish and Mexican silversmiths to Navajo and Zuni jewelry makers, New Mexico has gained a reputation for finely wrought baubles. But the blending of cultures and their traditions didn’t stop there. By tracking the evolution from the 1870s to the 21st century, visitors to the Albuquerque Museum exhibit, American Jewelry from New Mexico can essentially trace the history of the state. “There is so much jewelry being created here that’s never been shown as New Mexico jewelry,” says curator Andrew Connors.

Kathaleen Roberts of Albuquerque Journal also wrote a preview of the show. This is a tidbit that mentions our artist Debra Baxter:

Other pieces lean more toward the outrageous. Santa Fe artist Debra Baxter created a set of silver and crystal brass knuckles from quartz and silver-plated bronze. The internationally known artist recently completed a show at Washington, D.C.’s Renwick Gallery. “It’s much more of a conceptual piece,” Connors said. “It’s about power and authority and the idea of protecting yourself.”

More recently, Grace Parazzoli covered the exhibition for Santa Fe New Mexican and also mentioned Debra’s work:

The modern pieces, like those earliest in the exhibition, are materially innovative, from Debra Baxter’s brass knuckles crowned with aqua aura quartz (2017) to Kristin Diener’s New Orleans and Alabama/Mississippi Gulf Coast Love Story: Loss and Lament: Fertility Reliquary II (2005), a reliquary that sits upon a mannequin as though it were a chastity belt. The piece’s 23 materials include toy scissors, a Route 66 guitar pick, a candy wrapper, and vintage nude photographs. (Baxter and Diener live in Santa Fe and Albuquerque, respectively; both are from the Midwest.)

Learn more about the exhibition in our previous blog post, and check out work by the other form & concept artists featured in the show on our website. In addition to Baxter, form & concept designers Robert Ebendorf, Robin Waynee, Ryan Roberts, and Steven Ford & David Forlano of Ford / Forlano are all on view.

Image: Albuquerque Museum.

Preview: Soul of Nations

Soul of Nations- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Frank Rose and Sandy Zane of form & concept, with Ernest Hill and Soul of Nations artists. 

It’s safe to say that the Brea Foley Art Program is one-of-a-kind. The initiative, by Washington, D.C. and Arizona-based nonprofit Soul of Nations, vaults teens from Southwestern Indigenous communities into the upper echelons of the art world. This year’s program had hundreds of applicants and 15 finalists, all between the ages of 15 and 18. Three winners jetted off to Manhattan for a residency at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Later in the summer, all of the finalists will exhibit together at form & concept gallery in Santa Fe, on the weekend of this year’s SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market.

The Soul of Nations group exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, August 17, 5 to 7 pm, followed by an artist talk on Saturday, August 18, 1 to 2 pm. Inspired by the theme “Honor the Earth,” the participants offer fresh perspectives on Indigenous identity, contemporary culture and the state of the environment.

Soul of Nations Group Exhibition- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Maiyah King, Sanctity, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20 in.


“Art is its own language,” says Ernest Hill, cofounder of Soul of Nations. “People might not want to hear what you have to say about your own plight, but you could look at a canvas and that could ignite a discussion.” That was the founding philosophy for Soul of Nations, which Hill dreamed up with his childhood friend Brea Foley. Hill and Foley grew up in Denver but had strong connections to Navajo Nation in the Four Corners region: Foley’s heritage was Navajo, and Hill’s family conducted missionary work on Native reservations when he was young. They were both interested in addressing the extreme poverty divide between Indigenous communities and the rest of the Southwest.

“There was this drastic disconnect between on-reservation life and off-reservation life,” Hill says. “I made a promise to myself that I wouldn’t go back unless I could do something about it.” Foley passed away in 2014 from breast cancer, but Hill carried on their mission and officially incorporated Soul of Nations as a 501(c)3 the following year. The organization has a broad charter, seeking to uplift the vast numbers of displaced Indigenous communities throughout the Americas.

Soul of Nations Group Exhibition- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Mikhail Ganadonegro, Mother Earth, acrylic on canvas, 23 x 27.5 in.

Hill created the Brea Foley Art Program as a tribute to his late collaborator, with the more targeted mission of providing art world opportunities to Native teens from the Southwest. “At the beginning, we had a focus group and asked students, ‘What are you most interested in doing?’” says Hill. “About 80% of the students said that they were really interested in the arts as a career path. We wanted to show them ways to be successful.”

The Brea Foley Art Program has grown and evolved in the three years since its founding. Hill says awareness of the initiative has grown significantly, with 253 applicants for this year’s program. In addition to the residency at Tisch School of the Arts, this year’s winners—Maiyah King of Albuquerque, Bailey Pete of Gallup, and Christine Garcia of Santa Fe—participated in a special reception at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York City. “Last year we did a series of college tours and museum tours, but we wanted to find a school that was dedicated to investing in youth at a larger level,” says Hill. “NYU really stepped up to the plate.”

Soul of Nations Group Exhibition- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kiara Tom, The Y’ell Night Chants, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 18 in.

Hill also wanted to build a bridge to the commercial art world for the program’s participants. That’s how form & concept came into the picture. “It’s a whole new realm for us in terms of education,” says Hill. “We want to teach them how to work with a marketing team, but also how to market yourself in the commercial art scene. Being an artist is like having a sole proprietorship.” All 15 of this year’s finalists will contribute an artwork to the Soul of Nations group exhibition at form & concept. They hail from 11 different tribal communities throughout the Southwest.

Their work will debut at the gallery on the weekend of the SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market, which attracts over 100,000 visitors to buy art directly from 1,000 artists who represent more than 200 federally recognized tribes from the U.S. and Canada. The show’s opening reception also features the debut of an art installation by Armond Lara, an internationally renowned artist with Navajo heritage.

Learn more about the exhibition.
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Featured Artists: Mikhail K. Ganadonegro, Quansha J. Abayta, Maiyah King, Bailey Makai Pete, Deanna Lee, Christine Garcia, Naomi Smart, Kyle Begay, Megan Joe, Rikki Begay, Iona Stevens, Naomi Begay, Josiah Whitesinger, Lehlahni Michelle, Kiara Tom