Artist Talk: Ryan Singer | Childhood Mythologies

Ryan Singer hosts an artist talk for his solo exhibition, Childhood Mythologies on Saturday, March 30 from 2 to 3 pm. Childhood Mythologies showcases original narratives inspired by dreams and childhood memories while interweaving subtle socio-political commentary.

For Singer, the exhibition is an opportunity to showcase his paintings on a larger scale. Although the theme of Childhood Mythologies offered Singer the opportunity to touch on social issues, the artist is purposefully withholding commentary or explanation. “The paintings are different parts of my life, and I put them together like a puzzle,” the artist explains. “I think if I say too much it ruins it, so I leave it up to interpretation. I want other people to weave their own stories into it as well.”

 

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Learn more about the opening reception.

 

 

Opening: Ryan Singer | Childhood Mythologies

Albuquerque artist Ryan Singer unveils a solo exhibition of acrylic paintings of Navajo Nation landscapes populated by cultural icons. The artist’s vivid imagery showcases original narratives inspired by dreams and childhood memories while interweaving subtle socio-political commentary.

“My older sister was really into sci-fi. If she wanted to see a movie, she had to drag me along,” says Albuquerque painter Ryan Singer. “I remember watching Star Wars, Godzilla, and old black-and-white movies like Frankenstein or The Mummy.” Pretty soon, the iconic beasts had traveled from the silver screen into the artist’s psyche—plaguing Singer with vivid nightmares of monsters standing outside his bedroom window or chasing him through his neighborhood. Years later, the artist still has intense dreams, but they’re a welcomed occurrence. “It keeps my mind focused,” Singer explains. “It feels like there’s a spirit or muse guiding me and influencing me.” In his solo exhibition Childhood Mythologies, opening Friday, March 29 from 5 to 7 pm, Singer presents vibrant acrylic paintings imbued with his own youthful legends: Navajo landscapes populated by characters from comic books and popular culture.

 

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Workshop: Nika Feldman | Tees & Tabs

PLEASE NOTE: This workshop is registration-only. Click here to save your spot.

Tees & Tabs Workshop

Saturday, March 16

Workshop Hours: 1-5 pm

Fee: $40 registration

In conjunction with the exhibition Spirits in the Material World, featuring a series of seven garment-like works made from recycled t-shirt fabric and aluminum can pull-tabs, Nika Feldman offers this special workshop. Participants will learn how to let these idiosyncratic materials direct their creative process. Feldman will teach basic embroidery techniques. All supplies included.

This class is limited to 20 participants, so make sure to register early! The $40 registration fee reserves your spot.

Click here to register.

Spirits in the Material World Events

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, January 26, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Tees & Tabs Workshop: Saturday, March 16, 1-5 pm | Register`

Performance: Maurice Oliver | Santa Fe Sweet

Please Note: The gallery will ask for a $5-$25 donation in support of the artists at the door. Doors open at 6:30 pm and music starts at 7 pm.

“This is my emerging from the cocoon, as it were,” says Maurice Oliver. The musician, originally from New York City, will perform pieces from his still-developing album, “Santa Fe Sweet”—the first music he’s produced since moving to Eldorado in June 2018. “This wonderful place informs everything about the music from what sounds I program in the synthesizers to what other instruments I’m putting together.” Accompanied by his brother Steve and bassist Gary Paul Hermus, on February 23 Oliver will unveil his reactions to his new environment in an immersive concert experience forged from abstract visuals and unconventional, highly eclectic music.   

 

Oliver’s music incorporates elements of electronica, downtempo, house, techno, jazz, funk, soul, and worldbeat. He draws from a wide range of influences, beginning with the summer conga drums and church gospel music he heard growing up on Staten Island and leading to his study of orchestral percussion at the Juilliard School of Music. Living in Amsterdam in the late 1980’s, when the city was a burgeoning center of electronic production, introduced Oliver to influences from across the world. The result is the musician’s unique, texturized aesthetic: a modern music which is neither exclusively organic nor exclusively electronic.

Workshop: Lisa Klakulak | Felt Form

PLEASE NOTE: This workshop is registration-only. Click here to save your spot.

Felt Form: Sculpting by way of Shrinkage

February 23-24, 2019

Workshop Hours: 9 am-4 pm, with a one-hour lunch break.

Fees: $300 registration / $15 materials

In conjunction with the exhibition Since Taos, featuring a collection of felt-based work created between 2001 and the present day, Lisa Klakulak will offer a 2-day course focusing on wet felting techniques to develop three-dimensional forms. Participants will explore the use of resists to build hollow forms while the placement of different weights of wool within the layout preparation determine the concave and convex areas of the form, a method Klakulak terms “extreme differential shrinkage.” Working with a limited palette of wool, the emphasis will be on exploring a plethora of small-scale forms, the relationship of pressure and directional agitation to the felting process, and—of course—enjoying the feel of this humble material.

This class is limited to ten participants, so make sure to register early! The $300 registration fee reserves your spot, while the $15 registration fee is due at the start of the workshop.

Click here to register.

Since Taos Events

Preview Artist Talk: Friday, February 22, 4-5 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, February 22, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Felting Workshop: Feb. 23-24, $315 | Register Here.

Preview Artist Talk: Lisa Klakulak

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Lisa Klakulak appears at this special preview of Since Taos: Contraction of Mass, Concision of Thought, directly preceding the opening reception of the solo exhibition. The series of 13 felt-based sculptures was created over a period of nearly two decades, since the freewheeling artist moved away from Taos, New Mexico in 2001. Klakulak thinks of her life since that moment in distinct phases. “The works are all related to these leaps of faith that I have taken,” she says. “I want to think about, or articulate what I’m thinking about, in a manner that I can translate into a physical form.” Join her for an interactive tour of the show, just before its official debut.

Learn more about this exhibition.

 

 

EVENTS

Preview Artist Talk: Friday, February 22, 4-5 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, February 22, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Felting Workshop: Feb. 23-24, $315 | Register Here.

Artist Talk: Nika Feldman | Spirits in the Material World

Nika Feldman hosts an artist talk for her solo exhibition Spirits in the Material World on Saturday, January 26 from 2 to 3 pm. Spirits in the Material World is an exploration of the coded language of garments, within Feldman’s native cultural context. The show’s title holds multiple references, one being as Feldman explains, “The belief that the spirits of both the maker and the wearer are held within a garment.” Another reference is to a song with the same name by The Police from the 1981 album Ghost in the Machine, which one could argue describes the unfortunate state of realities today. The underlying message within the song that resonates for Feldman is the description of a material culture, which is void of sacredness.

Learn more about this exhibition.

 

EVENTS

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, January 26, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Tees & Tabs Workshop: Saturday, March 16, 1-5 pm | Register

Opening: Nika Feldman | Spirits in the Material World

Nika Feldman unveils a series of seven garment-like works along with accompanying objects of adornment, made from recycled t-shirt parts and salvaged aluminum can pull-tabs. Representing over 2,000 hours of handwork by the Nova Scotia artist, the intricate pieces are inspired by the coded language of clothing. “It’s an attempt to create a new dialect,” Feldman says. “In today’s world what does contemporary clothing say about North American culture?” 

Spirits in the Material World debuts with a special reception on Friday, January 25 from 5 to 7 pm. Feldman will host an artist talk on Saturday, January 26 from 2 to 3 pm and a workshop on Saturday, March 16 from 1 to 5 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

EVENTS

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, January 26, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Tees & Tabs Workshop: Saturday, March 16, 1-5 pm | Register

The Play Issue | Print Release Party & Fashion Show

Good Mood Studio, formerly known as 1905 Magazine, hosts a release party and fashion show for their winter release, The Play Issue. Directed by Keynan Johnson, the fashion show will echo the varied aesthetics and collaborative energy that has become synonymous with Good Mood Studio.

read more

Artist Spotlight: Heidi Brandow

 

 

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Heidi Brandow, Margins, mixed media on panel, 18 x 24 in

 

“I knew from an early age that our native identity is so rich that we shouldn’t just hold it to a specific ceremony or spiritual practice,” Heidi Brandow said during a studio visit in 2016. “In my eyes, art is a tool that helps mark history, time, place and memory. Who’s to say pop culture are not equally as important as star sticks?”

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Brandow’s works often feature whimsical monsters and characters against vividly colorful backdrops and paper collages she collects on her international travels.

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Brandow was recently awarded the third Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists.

“As an artist with an active arts practice, a full-time commitment to the Institute of American Indian Arts, and a family,” says Heidi. “I am grateful for Ucross’ support in granting me the time, space, and resources to enhance my craft and create in such a beautiful setting.”

 

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Low Tide, mixed media painting, 5.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 in

 

To learn more about Heidi, please inquire or call us at (505) 216-1256.

Click here to view more works by Heidi Brandow in our collection.

Scroll below to read excerpts from our 2016 studio interview.

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

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Floating, mixed-media on panel, 5 x 5 x 3 in

 

How does your own cultural heritage figure into your work? 

I never entered the art scene on the basis of promoting myself or my work as Native art. Not because I was shying away from it, but because my idea of Native art was a lot of very cultural referenced work, such as very specific tribal motifs and designs. The stuff that I was doing wasn’t like that. I never felt weird about it, because I always felt like my Native identity is already in this work, whether or not there’s symbols or direct references to cultural place. The simple fact that I’m Native and that this is the work that I’m making, there’s no way of denying my heritage and my experience, or saying that it’s not implicitly in the work. I don’t believe it has to have direct references to culture and place.

Culturally Native people are so diverse and our experience is so diverse. If you look at someone like myself, being Native Hawaiian and Navajo or Dinè, they’re two entirely different cultures. They’re both Native, but it’s ocean and desert people. That’s only the first difference, right? Of course we have a lot of similar cultural values, but it’s like night and day in a lot of ways.

 

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Fences (diptych) mixed media painting, 5.5 x 11 x 1.5 in

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artsit, heidi brandow altin, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow altin art, form and concept altin, form & concept altin, form & concept altin heidi brandow

Altin, mixed-media, 5.5 x 12 x 1 in