Closing Reception: Matthew Mullins | The Sun In Our Bones

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Join Matthew Mullins at a closing reception for his solo exhibition The Sun In Our Bones on Saturday, November 17 from 5-7 pm. His work will span form & concept’s ground floor, the second exhibition in the gallery’s two-year history to devote an entire level to a single artist. The title of the exhibition is a reference to an unconventional material Mullins has incorporated into some of his cosmic paintings: pigment made from burnt animal bones. “The calcium and phosphorous in those bones, and our own, are made in stars,” Mullins says. “It’s truly all connected.”

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Events

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 20, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Closing Reception: Saturday, November 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Artist Talk: Hand / Eye

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Join us for a interactive tour of the Hand/Eye group exhibition, featuring a number of the featured artists. Whether they’re gelatin silver prints or daguerreotypes, there’s one thing that most all photographs have in common: they’re flat. For this new group exhibition at form & concept, ten artists from across the United States shatter this convention by applying craft media to photography—and vice versa. Hand/Eye presents images with the texture and volume of sculptures, vaulting a medium that’s often trapped behind glass into the viewer’s sphere. The exhibition opens on Friday, October 26 from 5 to 7 pm.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, October 26, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 27, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening: Hand / Eye

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form & concept presents Hand/Eye, an exhibition of ten artists from across the United States who merge photography and craft mediums. The artworks in the show incorporate a wide array of materials—fiber, cast glass, micaceous clay, human hair—that shatter the picture plane and push photographic imagery into the real world. Hand/Eye debuts Friday, October 26 from 5 to 7 pm and runs through December 31, 2018. The opening reception coincides with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Santa Fe Railyard Arts District.

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Artists: Ginger Owen, Cathryn Amidei, Gary Goldberg, Elizabeth Claffey, Jodi Colella, Mira Burack, Ruben Olguin, Jayoung Yoon, Jacquelyn RoyalDavid Samuel Stern

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, October 26, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 27, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Artist Talk: Matthew Mullins | The Sun In Our Bones

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Matthew Mullins hosts an artist talk for his solo exhibition The Sun In Our Bones on Saturday, October 20 from 2 to 3 pm. When Mullins began working on the show last year, he was shooting for the stars. “I thought about this spectrum of very earthy and grounded to the cosmos,” says Mullins. “How do you encompass that staggering span, and pull someone all the way through it?” The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, September 28 from 5 to 7 pm. 

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 20, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Closing Reception: Saturday, November 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening: Matthew Mullins | The Sun In Our Bones

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Santa Fe artist Matthew Mullins presents a solo exhibition of paintings, photographs and sculptures, inspired by the intrinsic links between humans and the natural world. Known for his mixed-media paintings that visually connect landscapes with human-made, geometric patterns, Mullins broadens his practice to encompass photography and sculpture. With this expanded artistic palette, he draws viewers across time and space—from a windswept patch of grass to the swirling cosmos.

The monumental body of work, which will fill form & concept’s ground floor, is united by patterns that repeat throughout the universe at infinite scales. The Sun in our Bones debuts on Friday, September 28 from 5 to 7 pm. Mullins will host an artist talk on Saturday, October 20 from 2 to 3 pm and closing reception on Saturday, November 17 from 5 to 7 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, September 28, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, October 20, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Closing Reception: Saturday, November 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Performance: ppoacher ppoacher & Sevda Choir

Fearsome Friend Tour Launch

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Please Note: The gallery will ask for a $5-$25 donation in support of the artists at the door.

Caitlin Brothers is going places—specifically, all across the Southeastern United States. “The new tour passes through Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Texas,” says the Santa Fe musician, who performs under the moniker ppoacher ppoacher. “I’m trying to split it between familiar territory and places I’ve never explored.” That’s a good way to describe her musical repertoire for an upcoming Matron Records tour launch event at form & concept. Brothers and her new bandmate Nathan Smerage will perform songs from the band’s 2017 debut album, along with some new material they’ve written together. She’ll also sing traditional Balkan music with Santa Fe’s Sevda Choir, which welcomed her into its ranks a few months ago.

Learn more about ppoacher ppoacher.

Special Event: Murals of Tibet with Thomas Laird

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American photographer Thomas Laird appears at form & concept to tell stories of his new TASCHEN book Murals of Tibet, a first-of-its-kind photographic archive of Buddhist murals that took more than a decade to create. Visitors will get a chance to interact with the Collector’s Edition of the book. Light refreshments inspired by the cuisine of Tibet will be served. 

Using an innovative multi-image digital photography process, Laird captured murals as wide as 10 meters in life-size resolution. The publication of this unprecedented record of Tibetan art is so momentous that it caught the attention of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, who signed all 998 copies of the Collector’s Edition. As the Dalai Lama has explained, these murals are not just objects of beauty, but serve as points of reference and guidance for practitioners of Buddhism, yoga, and meditation, as well as for anyone seeking to incorporate mindfulness into their daily life.

A display copy of Murals of Tibet appears at form & concept from July 12 through August 31, as part of a national tour. Come experience these hidden treasures of Tibet in all their sublime vastness and intricacy.

Learn more about Murals of Tibet.

Preview: Soul of Nations

Soul of Nations- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Frank Rose and Sandy Zane of form & concept, with Ernest Hill and Soul of Nations artists. 

It’s safe to say that the Brea Foley Art Program is one-of-a-kind. The initiative, by Washington, D.C. and Arizona-based nonprofit Soul of Nations, vaults teens from Southwestern Indigenous communities into the upper echelons of the art world. This year’s program had hundreds of applicants and 15 finalists, all between the ages of 15 and 18. Three winners jetted off to Manhattan for a residency at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Later in the summer, all of the finalists will exhibit together at form & concept gallery in Santa Fe, on the weekend of this year’s SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market.

The Soul of Nations group exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, August 17, 5 to 7 pm, followed by an artist talk on Saturday, August 18, 1 to 2 pm. Inspired by the theme “Honor the Earth,” the participants offer fresh perspectives on Indigenous identity, contemporary culture and the state of the environment.

Soul of Nations Group Exhibition- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Maiyah King, Sanctity, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20 in.


“Art is its own language,” says Ernest Hill, cofounder of Soul of Nations. “People might not want to hear what you have to say about your own plight, but you could look at a canvas and that could ignite a discussion.” That was the founding philosophy for Soul of Nations, which Hill dreamed up with his childhood friend Brea Foley. Hill and Foley grew up in Denver but had strong connections to Navajo Nation in the Four Corners region: Foley’s heritage was Navajo, and Hill’s family conducted missionary work on Native reservations when he was young. They were both interested in addressing the extreme poverty divide between Indigenous communities and the rest of the Southwest.

“There was this drastic disconnect between on-reservation life and off-reservation life,” Hill says. “I made a promise to myself that I wouldn’t go back unless I could do something about it.” Foley passed away in 2014 from breast cancer, but Hill carried on their mission and officially incorporated Soul of Nations as a 501(c)3 the following year. The organization has a broad charter, seeking to uplift the vast numbers of displaced Indigenous communities throughout the Americas.

Soul of Nations Group Exhibition- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Mikhail Ganadonegro, Mother Earth, acrylic on canvas, 23 x 27.5 in.

Hill created the Brea Foley Art Program as a tribute to his late collaborator, with the more targeted mission of providing art world opportunities to Native teens from the Southwest. “At the beginning, we had a focus group and asked students, ‘What are you most interested in doing?’” says Hill. “About 80% of the students said that they were really interested in the arts as a career path. We wanted to show them ways to be successful.”

The Brea Foley Art Program has grown and evolved in the three years since its founding. Hill says awareness of the initiative has grown significantly, with 253 applicants for this year’s program. In addition to the residency at Tisch School of the Arts, this year’s winners—Maiyah King of Albuquerque, Bailey Pete of Gallup, and Christine Garcia of Santa Fe—participated in a special reception at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York City. “Last year we did a series of college tours and museum tours, but we wanted to find a school that was dedicated to investing in youth at a larger level,” says Hill. “NYU really stepped up to the plate.”

Soul of Nations Group Exhibition- Brea Foley Art Program- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kiara Tom, The Y’ell Night Chants, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 18 in.

Hill also wanted to build a bridge to the commercial art world for the program’s participants. That’s how form & concept came into the picture. “It’s a whole new realm for us in terms of education,” says Hill. “We want to teach them how to work with a marketing team, but also how to market yourself in the commercial art scene. Being an artist is like having a sole proprietorship.” All 15 of this year’s finalists will contribute an artwork to the Soul of Nations group exhibition at form & concept. They hail from 11 different tribal communities throughout the Southwest.

Their work will debut at the gallery on the weekend of the SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market, which attracts over 100,000 visitors to buy art directly from 1,000 artists who represent more than 200 federally recognized tribes from the U.S. and Canada. The show’s opening reception also features the debut of an art installation by Armond Lara, an internationally renowned artist with Navajo heritage.

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Featured Artists: Mikhail K. Ganadonegro, Quansha J. Abayta, Maiyah King, Bailey Makai Pete, Deanna Lee, Christine Garcia, Naomi Smart, Kyle Begay, Megan Joe, Rikki Begay, Iona Stevens, Naomi Begay, Josiah Whitesinger, Lehlahni Michelle, Kiara Tom

A Little-Told Story, A Long-Held Dream.

Later this month, when Armond Lara sends 75 winged buffalo sculptures into the stratosphere of form & concept’s atrium, he’ll fulfill a long-held dream. Lara has been depicting buffalo in his artwork for years, but more recently they’ve turned blue and sprouted wings. The Flying Blue Buffalo series is a reference to the Santa Fe artist’s family history: his grandmother, who was Navajo, was kidnapped as a small child and forced into servitude by a Mexican family. Across three centuries of Spanish, Mexican and American rule, thousands of Native children were similarly enslaved as household servants or field hands.

The Pueblo people called these abducted youths “Lost Bluebirds,” a symbol that Lara combined with the buffalo to create a new icon of Indigenous resilience. He dreamed up a massive installation of 75 winged buffalo sculptures, which came to fruition through a Kickstarter campaign and 3D printing technology. We’re hosting a preview of the installation on Thursday, August 16, featuring a talk by Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez of Santa Fe. The installation opens with a reception on Friday, August 17, and Lara conducts an artist talk on August 18.

Armond Lara- Flying Blue Buffalo Installation- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

“My grandmother didn’t talk much, but if she did talk, you listened,” says Lara. He’s known the story of his grandmother’s abduction for as long as he can remember, but it wasn’t until recently that he learned how common the practice was. “My sister was doing genealogy research on the family, and she found a list of all the Native American kids who had been ‘adopted’ by Mexican families in the Four Corners area,” says Lara. “It dawned on me, whoa, this is really widespread. That’s when I started asking other people about it.” He learned about the kidnapping and enslavement of an enormous number of Native American children over several centuries—from the 1600’s when the Spanish arrived, through the period of Mexican Independence, until the late 1800’s under the government of the United States. A number of Lara’s close friends revealed that they too had ancestors who were taken.

For Lara, this growing web of stories reminded him of his grandmother’s resilience, which has been an enduring source of inspiration. “I looked to my grandparents for guidance. The strongest voice was my grandmother’s voice,” Lara says. “She didn’t talk about it, she just did it. If she needed something, she’d make it. If she needed a robe, she’d weave one. I really admired that quality.” He dreamed up an art installation and storytelling project that might communicate this ethos, and inspire people to learn more about their heritage. A series of five winged blue buffalo marionettes that Lara carved from wood over a number of years became central conceptual elements.

Armond Lara- Flying Blue Buffalo Installation- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

With the help of his frequent collaborator Joseph Riggs, an artist and retired attorney who lives in Santa Fe, Lara pitched the idea to form & concept. The gallery commissioned a digital model and several mock-ups of the buffalo from Albuquerque technology firm 3D Proven Systems, while Lara and Riggs started gathering stories for the project. “We’ve represented Armond’s work for years, and were so excited to help bring his vision into reality,” says Sandy Zane, Owner of Zane Bennett Contemporary Art and form & concept. “For a project at this scale, we turned to 3D printing technology to capture the original carvings in high fidelity.” The gallery mounted a Kickstarter campaign to fund a round of 3D-printed sculptures, which were used to create molds for a final series of 75 cast resin sculptures.  

Riggs says the scale of the installation is vital to the project, because it communicates the staggering number of children, families and communities affected by the issue. “I’ve lived in the Southwest my whole life, and I was unfamiliar with the story,” says Riggs. “You can’t find it in history books in New Mexico, but as I learned, there were slave markets all across this region. It became a deep part of the culture of the Southwest.” Each of the 75 buffalo sculptures will represent the story of one “Lost Bluebird,” with oral and written accounts of their fight for survival. “People in New Mexico have been searching for a way to explore this part of their family history,” Riggs says. “They can take pride in the fact that they’re Hispanic, and they’re Native American, and they’re American. There’s so much division in our country. We need to find ways to show our unity, to show how much we’re alike rather than how we’re different. And I think we can do it through this story.”

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Armond Lara- Flying Blue Buffalo Installation- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

TONIGHT: Annual Exhibition 2018

Fiber Artist Mark Newport- Sweatermen- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

form & concept’s Annual Exhibition 2018 opens tonight from 5-7 pm! The show features work by all ten of our represented artists, including two new pieces from Mark Newport‘s Sweatermen series (above). “The Sweatermen are heroes of my own invention,” he says. “In each of these works I forge a link between childhood experience and my adult exploration of protection, masculinity, and heroism.” Michael Abatemarco of Pasatiempo covered the Annual Exhibition in this week’s Exhibitionism section. Here’s an excerpt:

Each summer in July, Form & Concept presents its Annual Exhibition featuring works by its represented artists including Heidi Brandow, Debra Baxter, and Wesley Anderegg. “From the beginning, we were interested in reimagining what an art gallery could be,” gallery director Frank Rose said. “The natural starting point was asking, ‘What’s been exhibited, and what or who has been excluded?’ ” The gallery’s roster includes artists whose works explore the diaphanous borders between art, craft, and design.

Click here to read more, and we’ll see you at the opening tonight!

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