Opening: Jaydan Moore | Dust

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Virginia artist Jaydan Moore is known for his sculptures made from found, silver-plated tableware. After six years of manipulating these lost heirlooms to reflect on memory and commemoration, he’s accumulated thousands of scrap metal fragments. In his solo exhibition Dust, Moore incorporates the shards into a new series of sculptures. Through these palimpsests and an array of intaglio prints, the artist explores the slow deterioration of memory. Dust opens on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm, with an artist talk on Saturday, June 30 from 2 to 3 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts

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We’re honored to announce that internationally renowned jewelry designers Robin Waynee and Ryan Roberts are form & concept’s newest represented artists. The couple has worked side-by-side since 1997, and though they strongly influence each other, they maintain separate practices and bodies of work. They’ll present new designs at the special event Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm.

Robin Waynee

Robin Waynee learned at an early age how creativity and hard work can lead to fulfillment. A member of the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, Robin was born and raised in Mio, Michigan along with six siblings. Following her family to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1991, and continuing to work in the family business of custom furniture making, Robin began designing her own pieces and pursued woodworking for several years.

After meeting local jeweler Ryan Roberts in 1997, Robin became inspired by his work and discovered a burning desire to create jewelry. Her wide range of jewelry styles, creative choices of precious stone and metal combinations and anodizing schemes, along with her careful selection of quality materials and attention to detail make Robin’s jewelry highly sought after by the discriminating collector and devotee of exclusive fine jewelry.

Browse Robin’s work.

Ryan Roberts

Born in the small village of Chimayo in Northern New Mexico, Ryan was raised in a family in which almost everyone is an artist. When he was a young teen, Ryan lived in Hawaii for a year, where he spent time with his aunt Gayle Bright, a talented sculptor and jewelry designer. Seeing the skill and care with which she made her art inspired him, and he began to cultivate a love and appreciation of jewelry making which would lead him to his life work.

Upon returning home to New Mexico, just after his 16th birthday, Ryan secured an apprenticeship at a local jeweler’s studio. By the age of 19, Ryan was hired by one of Santa Fe’s most talented local jewelers, Mario Chavez. In this environment, the young artist was exposed to an expanded array of complex tools and techniques. Ryan’s reputation grew as one of the finest jewelers in Santa Fe. Later, Ryan met the only person he had ever taken as an apprentice: his future wife, Robin Waynee. The two would both go on to become interationally celebrated jewelers.

Browse Ryan’s work.

This Friday: Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts

Introducing Robin Waynee and Ryan Roberts- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Special Reception

Introducing Robin Waynee & Ryan Roberts

Friday, June 29th, 5-7 pm

Internationally renowned jewelry designers Robin Waynee and Ryan Roberts are form & concept’s newest represented artists. The couple has worked side-by-side since 1997, and though they strongly influence each other, they maintain separate practices and bodies of work. They’ll present new designs at this special event, coinciding with the debut of Jaydan Moore’s solo exhibition Dust.

Learn more about this event.
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Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Faceted Pearl Pendant, 18k gold, tahitian pearl, garnet, diamond, amethyst.
Ryan Roberts- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ryan Roberts, Rubellite Tourmaline Ring, 18k gold, rubellite tourmaline, diamond, tsavorite, amethyst.
Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Aquamarine Ring, 18k gold, aquamarine, diamond.
Ryan Roberts- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ryan Roberts, Chrysocolla Gem Silica Ring, 18k gold, gem silica, tsavorite, diamond.
Robin Waynee- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Robin Waynee, Pearl, Diamond & Sapphire Earrings, 18k gold, tahitian pearl, diamond, orange sapphire.
Ryan Roberts- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ryan Roberts, Platinum & Rubellite Tourmaline Ring, platinum, rubellite tourmaline, tsavorite, diamond.

Preview: Jaydan Moore | Dust

Jaydan Moore- Dust Solo Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Jaydan Moore comes from a long line of California tombstone carvers, which might explain his obsession with the concept of commemoration. “The trade goes back four generations,” says the Virginia artist. “I grew up watching people make accommodations for loved ones, and turn their history into an object.” About six years ago, Moore began collecting silver-plated tableware to use as a raw material for intricate sculptures.

By reshaping these culturally loaded objects, he turned them into vessels for his ideas about memory and material culture. In a new solo exhibition at form & concept, Moore manipulates scrap metal from previous artistic experiments to flip his conceptual universe on its head. “What are the stages of forgetting?” he asks. Dust opens on Friday, June 29 from 5 to 7 pm, with an artist talk on Saturday, June 30 from 2 to 3 pm.

Jaydan Moore- Leftovers 1- Found Silver-Plated Platter- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Moore earned his BFA in jewelry and metal arts from California College of the Arts. In graduate school at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, he started sculpting tableware because the material seemed like a strong proxy for memory. “Metal feels tough, but it actually has so much malleability,” Moore says. “It’ll take on dings and scratches and patinas, holding ‘recollections’ of experiences it’s been through.”

He imagined that the heirlooms were still connected to the people who once owned them, and that he could preserve these delicate biographical threads through his sculptures. In a concurrent series of intaglio prints, he recorded the patterns and marks on the platters before chopping them up. “The works on paper were initially just to document what I had found, and those last traces of whoever owned it before me,” he says. “I thought of it as the shadow of somebody.”

Jaydan Moore- Traces- Found Silver-Plated Platters- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Moore graduated with his MFA in 2012, and continued using the tableware as a sculptural medium. Six years on, Moore is an adjunct faculty member at Virginia Commonwealth University. His thoughts about how metal holds meaning have shifted considerably. “For so long, when I was making stuff I always thought there was this living memory in things, that I could feel the person before,” he says.

Lately he’s taken an interest in the way personal significance fades when an object changes hands. Moore realized that the clues he’d been following in the tableware said more about him than their previous owners. He developed an interest in the fragments of metal that were left behind in his studio. “I do so much conglomeration and cutting, so tons of material ends up in the scrap pile,” says Moore. “The earlier series was about the memory that endures, so maybe these scraps could speak to that slow deletion.”

Jaydan Moore- Dustings 3- Etching and Gold Leaf- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Dust features sculptures made from the glittering shards that landed on Moore’s cutting room floor. In his past work, the artist has taken pains to leave the flawed surfaces of the tableware relatively untouched. “In this series, I’m letting my own personal narrative of how I connect with the material be much more a part of what the viewer sees, or how I talk about it,” Moore says. “My fingerprints are now becoming patina marks on all of this.”

The exhibition also includes a new series of intaglio prints that show intricate tableware patterns fading away. Despite his recent meditations on memory’s decay, Moore can’t fully shake his earlier idea of objects as reliquaries of experience. “The child from the tombstone family believes that there is still this memory in there,” Moore says. “We wouldn’t still be talking about how much objects have a hold on us unless there was something deeply invested in it.”

Preview more artwork.
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Curator’s Selection: Matthew Mullins | Inner Orbit

For the second entry in our new Curator’s Selection video series (check out the first one here), form & concept gallery director Frank Rose discussed an artwork by Matthew Mullins from the group exhibition Inner Orbit. Matt’s mixed-media painting The Sun Is In Our Bones is an anchor of the show, which explores personal and cultural visions of outer space, and it’s also an introduction to his next body of work. In late September, he’ll debut a solo exhibition called The Sun In Our Bones that will span our ground floor. Learn more about the painting in the video above, then click over to the exhibition page to discover how it connects with the themes of the forthcoming show.

Matthew Mullins- The Sun Is In Our Bones- Mixed-Media Painting- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Here is Matt’s meditation on his painting The Sun Is In Our Bones:

The Sun Is In Our Bones is a meditation on the cosmic origins of the elements that comprise our bodies. The elements in our bodies such as carbon, calcium and iron were forged by the extreme forces that exist inside stars, supernovae and other cosmic events. It’s fascinating to think about the journey our bodies’ atomic ingredients have had, and that all of those individual atoms are now working together to form you and me. These elements that have existed for eons are engaged in a mysterious dance that allows us to maintain our complicated biological processes and even consciousness, empathy and love.

The black paint in this piece is made from burnt cow bones. The atoms of calcium and phosphorus from those bones, just like in our bones, were created in the stars. So, the material used in this painting was actually created in space and once provided life to other beings. The title The Sun In Our Bones is not only poetic, it can be taken somewhat literally. The bare linen that the stars seem to be growing into represents yet-to-be-created space. The handprints on the sides are traced from my hands and my wife’s hands, and represent the evolution of human consciousness from the elemental, raw ingredients created inside the stars.

Crystalline and Constellate are meditations on the subatomic world within our bodies. These paintings are nearly photo-realistic depictions of a matrix of atoms being lit up with a laser beam. The source photos that I painted from were taken with an electron microscope. I am awestruck by the intelligent orderliness, but also the mysterious fluidity, of the world experienced at this scale. Our own bodies look similar when viewed from a small enough vantage point.

Click here to browse the complete Inner Orbit exhibition on our website. The show appears in conjunction with Santa Fe Futurition, the Currents New Media Festival, and the Santa Fe Institute’s Interplanetary Festival.

New Shop Arrivals!

Check out new wearable artworks by three artists from the form & concept shop—including two designers who are new to our roster!

Suzanne Schwartz

Suzanne Schwartz- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Suzanne Schwartz, Sew Weave Necklace, oxidized argentium silver stitched with fine silver wire.

Suzanne Schwartz first discovered the freedom that art could bring when her grandmother taught her to sew and knit. Textiles inspired her even as a child: with their variety of patterns and textures, they opened her eyes to art’s boundless possibilities. As an adult, her creative medium moved from textiles to metals, but the stitches came with her, as seen in her Interwoven Collections. She finds texture and form in nature all around her: the surface of a leaf, the pattern of lichen on a branch, the curve where hills meet, the shadows of water over rocks. These lines and fluid shapes become part of her jewelry.

Suzanne Schwartz- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Suzanne Schwartz, Large Post Earrings, oxidized and bright silver argentium stitched with fine silver.
Suzanne Schwartz- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Suzanne Schwartz, Freeform Pendant, oxidized argentium stitched with fine silver wire.
Suzanne Schwartz- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Suzanne Schwartz, Layered Cuff, oxidized argentium stitched with 18k and fine silver wire.
Suzanne Schwartz- Fine Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Suzanne Schwartz, Layered 3-Piece Earrings, argentium silver stitched with fine silver.

Julie Slattery

Julie Slattery- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Julie Slattery, Bird Skull (mini), bronze.

Julie Slattery‘s wearable sculptures explore emotional responses of attachment and loss. The objects she creates reflect sensations of unease, oddity, and a recognition of something that was or could have been. Slattery is an Albuquerque-based artist who works at the Los Ranchos Fine Art Foundry. Through the process of casting, she creates artwork that necessitates the destruction of an original object. This is often representative of crucial moments or pivotal experiences in her life.

Julie Slattery- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Julie Slattery, Bark Necklace, bronze.
Julie Slattery- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Julie Slattery, Eye of Aquarius Belt Buckle, bronze.
Julie Slattery- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Julie Slattery, Orion’s Belt Buckle, bronze.
Julie Slattery- Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Julie Slattery, Hand Necklace, bronze.

Kat Cole

Kat Cole- Enamel on Steel Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kat Cole, Boundary Line Look Necklace, steel, enamel.

Kat Cole finds meaning through the observance and intimate awareness of the places she inhabits. With each geographic change, she has become more attuned to the natural and man-made attributes that make a location unique.  She looks to the built environment of the city where she lives for the formal qualities of her work: materials, forms, colors and surface qualities. The steel and concrete structures that surround us are evidence of human inhabitants, past and present. Cole distills her experiences of these monumental structures into the intimate scale of jewelry. They are completed when worn on the landscape of the body.

Kat Cole- Enamel on Steel Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kat Cole, Yellow Structure Ring, steel, enamel, sterling silver.
Kat Cole- Steel on Enamel Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kat Cole, Red Tube Ring, steel, enamel, sterling silver.
Kat Cole- Enamel on Steel Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kat Cole, Red Dangle Hoop Earrings, steel, enamel, sterling silver.
Kat Cole- Enamel on Steel Jewelry- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kat Cole, Yellow Oval Dip Earrings, steel, enamel, sterling silver.

Click here to browse the complete form & concept shop collection.

Curator’s Selection: Eric William Carroll | Inner Orbit

Our director Frank Rose spent months on a national search for artists who explore personal or cultural visions of outer space in their work. The resulting exhibition, Inner Orbit, presents the cosmos not as a dark void, but as a densely layered cultural landscape. We asked Frank to discuss two of the artists who appear in the show for a new video series called Curator’s Selection. First up is St. Paul-based artist Eric William Carroll, who contributed several works from his Standard Stars series to Inner Orbit. Watch the video above for Frank’s take, and read Eric’s thoughts on the body of work below.

From Eric:

My project Standard Stars draws from three years of research at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), located an hour outside of Asheville, North Carolina in the small town of Rosman, and surrounded by the Pisgah National Forest.

One of PARI’s missions is to collect and digitize the largest archive of astronomical glass-plate photographs, known as the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive, commonly referred to as APDA. Currently, APDA is a collection of over 200,000 public-domain glass plate negatives that have been acquired from institutions and individuals all over the world. The visual wealth of APDA is unparalleled, as it documents the history of photographing the sky from the late 1800’s until the end of the 20th century on a now obsolete medium. There is an undeniable physical beauty to these photographic objects, which explains why I have made many trips over the years to immerse myself in the collection.

With just over 1% of the archive scanned, most of the photographic plates sit in boxes and on shelves, slowly deteriorating. The emulsion peels off of the glass plate in a variety of patterns, as if nature is trying to creep back into these scientific studies. In these images I have carefully composed the flakes of emulsion and photographed them on a light table and then inverted the image. In some cases, such as NA8302, the astronomer accidentally spilled oil on the plate. In NA8075, the exposed plate wasn’t processed in enough developer solution. These errors bridge the gap between galaxy and astronomer.

All in all, I have made high-resolution scans and photographs of over 500 plates from APDA. Visually and metaphorically, APDA represents the human attempt to study, represent, and organize the Universe. The fact that this collection is in danger of disintegrating and being forgotten is sadly and beautifully poetic.

Click here to browse the complete Inner Orbit exhibition on our website. The show appears in conjunction with Santa Fe Futurition, the Currents New Media Festival, and the Santa Fe Institute’s Interplanetary Festival.

Performance: Nathan Wheeler

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The gallery will ask for a $5-$25 donation at the door in support of the artist. 

Composer and multidisciplinary artist Nathan Wheeler ensnares form & concept in a web of “ghost detection circuits”—also known as EMF meters—for this improvisational music and dance performance. The psychic energy of Wheeler and his spectators will trigger the sensors and influence swirling visuals and soundscapes. Wheeler is a New York-based artist who works at the intersection of sound design, dance, clothing design, video, and interactive programming. He has shown work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of the Moving Image, the Denver Art Museum, and at festivals around the globe.

Wheeler isn’t a ghost hunter, though he’s on the trail of something just as ephemeral in his innovative performance artworks. “My work often taps into the supernatural as a source of inspiration and healing,” says the New York-based artist. “What sort of energies do we project, and how can I use technology to make them perceptible?” He tackles that question in a new improvisational performance piece at form & concept, which utilizes EMF detectors and other technology to influence audiovisual aspects of the work. “We’re constantly casting psychic energy into the world. My audience at form & concept will be able to see it and hear it,” Wheeler explains.

Wheeler will perform among the artworks of form & concept’s Inner Orbit group exhibition, which appears in conjunction with the Santa Fe Institute’s Interplanetary Festival and the Currents New Media FestivalHis appearance is part of Futurition Santa Fe, a month long series of festivals and events that brings art, science and technology together.

Listen and be moved.

Nathan Wheeler- Peformance Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

form & concept has two events lined up for the weekend, and they’re not to be missed! Tonight is the closing reception for Debra Baxter’s solo exhibition Tooth & Nail (Friday, 6/15, 5-7 pm). On Saturday, we’re hosting Nathan Wheeler for an experimental music and performance piece among the artworks of Inner Orbit (Saturday, 6/16, 7-8:30 pm). Alex De Vore of Santa Fe Reporter chose Nathan’s event as a calendar pick this week. Here’s an excerpt:

Ever heard of an EMF meter? They’re those gadgets that detect electromagnetic fields or, in some cases, psychic energy and possibly ghosts. Spooky, right? But don’t be scared; New York-based multi-disciplinary artist and dancer Nathan Wheeler plans to use them for a non-spooky event.

Nathan Wheeler- Peformance Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Paul Weideman covered the performance in this week’s Pasatiempo. Here’s an excerpt:

Wheeler embarks on a communal experience with living people and perhaps with some more ethereal collaborators. One of his chief tools in this process is an instrument that can sense electromagnetic fields (EMFs). “We’ll all be sitting in a space, but basically what I’m doing is using ghost-detection circuits [EMF meters] to read the different sort of invisible energies that are in the space,” said the artist, who is known for his improvisational music and dance performances. “These circuits do things like detect electromagnetic interference and static electricity, but they also are supposed to detect ghosts.”

Learn more about both events in this blog post. We’ll see you this weekend!

Closing Reception: Debra Baxter | Tooth & Nail

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Join Debra Baxter for a last look at her solo exhibition Tooth & Nail at this closing reception on Friday, June 15 from 5 to 7 pm. The show officially closes on June 16, 2018.

Baxter frequently picks up materials she’s never used before, searching for novel ways to engage the histories of sculpture, jewelry, weaponry or drapery. For Tooth & Nail, the events of the #MeToo movement have fed into her continued interest in the strength, vulnerability and the raw power of the female voice. The courage of these women has activated work with a blend of toughness and vulnerability. “These contrasting materials carry a similar spirit,” she explains. “My sculptures sometimes look delicate, but when they’re finished, they are structurally resilient.”

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception | Friday, April 27, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk | Saturday, May 19, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Closing Reception | Saturday, June 15, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook