Artist Talk: Ryan Singer | Childhood Mythologies

Ryan Singer hosts an artist talk for his solo exhibition, Childhood Mythologies on Saturday, March 30 from 2 to 3 pm. Childhood Mythologies showcases original narratives inspired by dreams and childhood memories while interweaving subtle socio-political commentary.

For Singer, the exhibition is an opportunity to showcase his paintings on a larger scale. Although the theme of Childhood Mythologies offered Singer the opportunity to touch on social issues, the artist is purposefully withholding commentary or explanation. “The paintings are different parts of my life, and I put them together like a puzzle,” the artist explains. “I think if I say too much it ruins it, so I leave it up to interpretation. I want other people to weave their own stories into it as well.”

 

RSVP for this event.

Learn more about the opening reception.

 

 

Press Roundup: Nika Feldman | Spirits in the Material World

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Nika Feldman’s solo exhibition Spirits in the Material World opens Saturday, January 25 from 5-7 pm, coinciding with our sister gallery Zane Bennett Contemporary Art’s Stitched Ink. Both exhibitions deal with textiles, but with largely different implications.

“A culture’s clothing has its own language,” begins Megan Bennett of Albuquerque Journal’s write-up of Nika. “What that language is, or how cultural identities and values are reflected in garments, is what drives Nika Feldman’s work.” Bennett interviewed Feldman early this winter, excerpted here:

The pieces are intentionally made to be “garment-like” rather than actual clothing items, said Feldman, with the exception of an XXL black T-shirt she didn’t want to cut apart, and instead decorated with tabs and fringe tassles made from other shirts.

“When it’s artwork, people have to investigative, people have to go deeper into those narratives,” she said. “If it’s a wearable garment, it doesn’t go any farther than that. People see it as fashion, they want to know if it comes in their size, they want to know how much it is.”

 

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Emily Van Cleve covered Spirits in the Material World in a feature on the Santa Fe Arts Journal. Here’s an excerpt:

 

“All around the world, people wear t-shirts,” says Feldman, a Santa Fe artist who moved to town from Nova Scotia at the end of 2017. “T-shirts were originally an undergarment. But now, through their logos, they inform others about the specific groups, companies, rock bands and organizations we like.” Feldman liked the idea of putting pull-tabs in her work for the same reasons she was drawn to t-shirts. They’re readily available. There’s an abundant supply of them. They’re also an integral part of Western culture.

 

nika feldman camo dress, nika feldman artist, nika feldman spirits in the material world, nika feldman art, nika feldman textiles, nika feldman t-shirts and pull tabs, form & concept nika feldman, form and concept nika feldman, form and concept spirits in the material world, santa fe gallery, santa fe form & concept, santa fe gallery nika feldmanCamo Dress, recycled t-shirts & aluminum pull-tabs,embroidery, 50 x 45 in

The Santa Fean also covered Spirits in the Material World for their Holiday Issue. Here’s an excerpt:

Nika Feldman describes herself as a textile artist, rag picker, and costume stenographer, and her job history includes stints in fashion design, social work, and sorting through clothing in a thrift store. Feldman weaves these disparate threads into a whole in the eight pieces displayed in Spirits in the Material World.

 

Spirits in the Material World opens January 25 and runs through March 23. Nika Feldman will conduct an Artist Talk on January 26 at 2 pm.

Artist Spotlight: Heidi Brandow

 

 

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Heidi Brandow, Margins, mixed media on panel, 18 x 24 in

 

“I knew from an early age that our native identity is so rich that we shouldn’t just hold it to a specific ceremony or spiritual practice,” Heidi Brandow said during a studio visit in 2016. “In my eyes, art is a tool that helps mark history, time, place and memory. Who’s to say pop culture are not equally as important as star sticks?”

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Brandow’s works often feature whimsical monsters and characters against vividly colorful backdrops and paper collages she collects on her international travels.

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Brandow was recently awarded the third Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists.

“As an artist with an active arts practice, a full-time commitment to the Institute of American Indian Arts, and a family,” says Heidi. “I am grateful for Ucross’ support in granting me the time, space, and resources to enhance my craft and create in such a beautiful setting.”

 

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Low Tide, mixed media painting, 5.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 in

 

To learn more about Heidi, please inquire or call us at (505) 216-1256.

Click here to view more works by Heidi Brandow in our collection.

Scroll below to read excerpts from our 2016 studio interview.

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow floating, floating heidi brandow, heidi brandow monsters, floating form & concept, floating form and concept, mixed media painting, moster painting

Floating, mixed-media on panel, 5 x 5 x 3 in

 

How does your own cultural heritage figure into your work? 

I never entered the art scene on the basis of promoting myself or my work as Native art. Not because I was shying away from it, but because my idea of Native art was a lot of very cultural referenced work, such as very specific tribal motifs and designs. The stuff that I was doing wasn’t like that. I never felt weird about it, because I always felt like my Native identity is already in this work, whether or not there’s symbols or direct references to cultural place. The simple fact that I’m Native and that this is the work that I’m making, there’s no way of denying my heritage and my experience, or saying that it’s not implicitly in the work. I don’t believe it has to have direct references to culture and place.

Culturally Native people are so diverse and our experience is so diverse. If you look at someone like myself, being Native Hawaiian and Navajo or Dinè, they’re two entirely different cultures. They’re both Native, but it’s ocean and desert people. That’s only the first difference, right? Of course we have a lot of similar cultural values, but it’s like night and day in a lot of ways.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artist, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow diptych, fences diptych, form and concept fences diptych, form & concept

Fences (diptych) mixed media painting, 5.5 x 11 x 1.5 in

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artsit, heidi brandow altin, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow altin art, form and concept altin, form & concept altin, form & concept altin heidi brandow

Altin, mixed-media, 5.5 x 12 x 1 in

Tania Larsson: Traditional Meets Contemporary

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Tania Larsson starts with the land. Her materials are harvested from nature, then combined with silver, gold, and precious stones. The combination of traditional craft with a contemporary education results in striking, intricate adornment.

“My heritage is an integral part of who I am and my work,” said Tania Larsson in an interview with UNUM Magazine. “I wanted to present myself as a Gwich’in woman and needed cultural indicators that could be worn anywhere.”

Larsson maintains a studio in Yellowknife, but she hand delivers her jewelry works to our gallery shop. View some of our favorites below.

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Long Muskox Horn and Sterling Silver Earrings
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Long Bison Horn and Sterling Silver Earrings
tania larsson, tania larsson jewelry, tania larsson necklace, form and concept, form & concept shop, form & concept, santa fe jewelry, cairbou horn jewelry, santa fe jewelry
Etched Caribou Horn and Sterling Silver Necklace
tania larsson, tania larsson jewelry, tania larsson necklace, santa fe jewelry, form & concept shop, form and concept, form & concept
Bison Horn and Sterling Silver Necklace
tania larsson, tania larsson jewelry,  Triangle Muskox Horn and Sterling Silver Earrings, muskox horn jewelry, form & concept, santa fe gallery
Triangle Muskox Horn and Sterling Silver Earrings
tania larsson, tania larsson jewelry, Porcupine Claw and Sterling Silver Earrings, form & concept, form and concept shop
Porcupine Claw and Sterling Silver Earrings

 

 

Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez | Entre Cíbolos Criados: Creativity, Consciousness and Community

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Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez

In August, Dr. Estevan Rael-Gálvez convened beneath the Flying Blue Buffalo for a special lecture titled Entre Cíbolos Criados: Creativity, Consciousness and Community.

In his moving speech, Dr. Rael-Gálvez discusses the three concepts that have long defined his work and the history of Indigenous slavery.

His lecture is sampled below, and can be read in full at flyingbluebuffalo.com

It is a tremendous honor to be able to participate in this opening by the amazing artist, Armond Lara – whose memorial is… breath-taking, but it gives breath as well. This thoughtful remembering is a project — that through creativity raises consciousness — and in the end, is inspired by the promise of strengthening community.

Here in this sovereign landscape, Pueblo elders have said that,  wherever we go, we leave our breath behind us” — an invocation recognizing those who came before us and how their life force remains with us long after they have gone. In recognizing this life force, we not only illuminate all of the ancestors who lived in this place, but point especially to the life of those living now in the present, as well as to those generations that will follow, inheriting what we leave behind in the future.

In time, drawn to the subject of enslaved Indians as a young scholar, I would immerse myself as a historian in countless archives, reading between the lines of documents, tracing my finger across maps and looking closer at photographs, all complemented by my work as an anthropologist, engaged in many hundreds of conversations set with bread at kitchen tables, revealed upon a walk through alfalfa fields, and shared across miles by telephone and electronic correspondence. 

Taking those experiences, connecting them and eventually centering them, the story grew like a forest, one that eventually became a manuscript defended by me to hold a doctoral credential. However, believing that scholarship is most valuable when grounded and applied in the world, I left academia, and yet through my role as a public historian and anthropologist, indeed, because of it, the story only deepened further, to this day.

So when I talk about consciousness now, I am not only referring to the work I have done as a scholar and public historian for over two decades, but a commitment to raising consciousness on the ground, locally, in the minds of people in our region and nation, particularly in the minds of those who have not yet recognized that this story, however painful, is also one of complex beauty. This is no easy task.

The eyes of all of the descendants of those indigenous ancestors continue to awaken the possibility of remembering with each new birth of a New Mexican. Telling this Story—in whatever form that telling comes— is about how individual and collective lives are remembered, how a community takes the memories, stories and traditions of what has been passed down from one generation to the next, and how it reimagines itself, now in the present and into the future. We are the herd of buffalo that rises.

Dr. Rael-Gálvez holds a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he completed an award-winning dissertation, “Identifying Captivity and Capturing Identity: Narratives of American Indian Slavery.” Formerly the State Historian of New Mexico, Executive Director of the National Hispanic Cultural Center, and Senior Vice President at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Dr. Rael-Gálvez currently is a writer and the founding principal of Creative Strategies 360°.

 

 

 

 

Artist Talk: Flying Blue Buffalo Installation

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Santa Fe artist Armond Lara and his collaborator Joseph Riggs discuss the story behind the Flying Blue Buffalo installation on Saturday, August 18, 2-3 pm. The monumental art installation, comprising 77 winged buffalo sculptures, tells the centuries-long story of enslaved Native American children. Inspired by his own family history, Lara dreamed up the winged buffalo as a new symbol of Native survival and resilience.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Preview with guest speaker Estevan Rael-Gálvez:
Thursday, August 16, 5:30-6:30 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening Reception: Friday, August 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, August 18, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Closing Reception: Saturday, November 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Artist Talk: Soul of Nations

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Native teen artists from the Soul of Nations group exhibition join Ernest Hill, executive director of Soul of Nations, for an interactive tour of the show.

It’s safe to say that the Brea Foley Art Program is one-of-a-kind. The initiative, by Washington, D.C. and Arizona-based nonprofit Soul of Nations, vaults teens from Southwestern Indigenous communities into the upper echelons of the art world. This year’s program had hundreds of applicants and 15 finalists, all between the ages of 15 and 18. Three winners jetted off to Manhattan for a residency at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Now, all of the finalists will exhibit together at form & concept gallery in Santa Fe, on the weekend of this year’s SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market. Soul of Nations opens with a reception on Friday, August 17 from 5 to 7 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, August 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, August 18, 1-2 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening: Armond Lara | Flying Blue Buffalo Installation

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Armond Lara collaborates with form & concept on this monumental art installation that tells the centuries-long story of enslaved Native American children. The Santa Fe artist sends 77 hand-painted, cast resin Flying Blue Buffalo sculptures soaring through the gallery’s atrium. Inspired by his own family history, Lara dreamed up the winged buffalo as a new symbol of Native survival and resilience. Each sculpture in the suspended flock is labeled with the name of an abducted child. The installation debuts at a special reception on Friday, August 17, 5-7 pm, on the weekend of Santa Fe Indian Market.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Events

Preview with guest speaker Estevan Rael-Gálvez:
Thursday, August 16, 5:30-6:30 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening Reception: Friday, August 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, August 18, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Closing Reception: Saturday, November 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Opening: Soul of Nations

RSVP on Facebook.

Soul of Nations, a Washington, D.C. and Arizona-based nonprofit that works to uplift Indigenous communities throughout the Americas, presents this juried exhibition of Native teen artists from Southwest reservations. The 15 featured artists all took part in the organization’s Brea Foley Art Program, which awarded three of them with a special residency at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. The exhibition opens on the weekend of SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market and offers boundary-pushing aesthetic statements from a new generation of Indigenous artists. The theme of the exhibition is “Honor the Earth.”

Learn more about this exhibition.

Artists

Mikhail K. Ganadonegro, Quansha J. Abayta, Maiyah King, Bailey Makai Pete, Deanna Lee, Christine Garcia, Naomi Smart, Kyle Begay, Megan Joe, Rikki Begay, Iona Stevens, Naomi Begay, Josiah Whitesinger, Lehlahni Michelle, Kiara Tom

Events

Opening Reception: Friday, August 17, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Artist Talk: Saturday, August 18, 1-2 pm | RSVP on Facebook.