Call for Artists: Brea Foley Art Program

Deadline: Wednesday, December 20, 2017

LEARN MORE & DOWNLOAD THE APPLICATION.

The Brea Foley Art Program is looking for 15 outstanding teen artists who reside on Native reservations in the Southwest. High school students ages 15-18 are eligible to apply for this project that offers exciting opportunities to create, discuss and exhibit artwork. They’ll travel to New York City for a special reception at the National Museum of the American Indian, engage in an artist residency project at New York University, and exhibit their artwork at form & concept in Santa Fe, New Mexico during Indian Market in August 2018. The Brea Foley Art Program is run by the 501(c)3 nonprofit Soul of Nations.

Soul of Nations

Soul of Nations is a nonprofit that uplifts Native American youth through engagement in the arts, encouraging academic excellence, and inspiring business entrepreneurship. Established in 2015, Soul of Nations exists to inspire Native American youth to pursue and achieve their goals. We stress the importance of education and provide Tribal youth with a platform for free expression. Our programs help to foster the next generation of community leaders in the fields of art and business.

Learn more.

Brea Foley Art Program

The Brea Foley Art Program is an initiative created by Soul of Nations to help fulfill the organization’s mission to galvanize artistic zeal among Indigenous communities. It is dedicated to showcasing and celebrating cultural art created by Native American youth.

The program was conceived by the late co-founder of Soul of Nations, Brea Foley. Although she is no longer with us, her spirit lives on through the consciousness of art. Foley was a firm believer in the longevity of culturally infused artwork and wanted to inspire artistic talent among youth who live in displaced communities. The Brea Foley Art Program is designed to do just that.

The project aims to rebuild cultural self-confidence, challenge personal boundaries, and foster cultural continuity while reflecting artistic diversity. Soul of Nations wants to show the world that our nation’s first people are still here and thriving in the best ways possible. What better way to validate contemporary Native life and strength than through the arts? Soul of Nations believes that art is a universal language that carries the story of honesty, history, and belonging.

Completed applications for the 2017-18 program are due Wednesday, December 20, 2017. Once admitted, the artists will have from Friday, December 22, 2017 – Friday, February 23, 2018 to complete and submit their artwork. On Saturday, March 3, 2018, all artists and will gather to display their artwork at the Navajo Nation Museum in the form of an art showing. At the art showing, all work will be critiqued by a team of judges. These judges will range from renowned artists, curators, gallerists, and regional sponsors.

All 15 artists granted admission into the Brea Foley Art Program will have the opportunity to be exhibited at form & concept, located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Friday, August 17, 2018. Soul of Nations will also exhibit all artworks in an online exhibition for one year.

Judges will be responsible for selecting the top three artists of the competition who will be crowned as the 2018 Brea Foley Art Program Finalists. The three program finalists will travel to New York City on Tuesday, June 5, 2018 to be celebrated at a reception held at the National Museum of the American Indian – New York and to engage in the artist residency project at New York University.

The reception event at the National Museum of the American Indian – New York will be held on Friday, June 8, 2018 and the artist residency project will be held from Tuesday, June 5, 2018 – Friday, June 8, 2018. The top three 2018 Brea Foley Art Program Finalists are scheduled to fly out to New York City on Tuesday, June 5, 2018. Once arrived, the artists will be housed on the campus of New York University. The artists will also be chaperoned by members of the Soul of Nations Team.

Learn more.

2017/18 Program Theme

The theme of this years’ program is Honor the Earth. All submitted artwork must adhere to this theme, and artists may be expected to provide a description of the artwork.

LEARN MORE & DOWNLOAD THE APPLICATION.

Jaque Fragua in Neon.

Jacques Fragua Neon Sculpture- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Jacques Fragua, Sold Out, neon, 29 x 48.25 x 3 in.

Neon has been in use an artistic medium for decades, but there’s something about it that seems perpetually of the “now.” Its glow makes it feel like a living thing, and the low hum it gives off could be friendly or threatening. The blue-green quality of neon light conjures a feeling of Americana and a gritty futurist sensation at the same time. Jaque Fragua bends this culturally loaded medium to his will in a series of provocative sculptures that illuminate the walls and windows of form & concept. Fragua’s neon creations parody the kitsch of curio shops and critique the appropriation of Native American aesthetics with biting wit. Crave reported on Fragua’s early influences in a profile last year:

Jaque Fragua Neon Sculpture- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Jaque Fragua, Ceci N’est Pas Une Pipe, neon, 16.5 x 48.25 x 2.5 in.

From humble beginnings and a large family, Fragua grew up in an adobe house on Jemez Pueblo, about an hour northwest of Albuquerque. He began painting ceremonial objects for dances and cultural rituals in his youth. As an adolescent, he attended high school in Denver, and got into graffiti (along with some trouble). Formal training at the Institute of the American Indian Arts in Santa Fe followed.

Pre-Internet, the mainstream public didn’t know what was happening on reservations or in contemporary Native culture; Fragua saw an opportunity to use his experiences as the basis for his body of work. “I felt like the art I was interested in making could be a conduit for dialogue and to spread that awareness,” he says.

Jaque Fragua Neon Sculpture- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Jaque Fragua, Drive Through Liquor, neon, 24 x 23.75 x 3.75 in.

Fragua discussed the experience of moving through the world as a Native artist with Santa Fe Reporter in 2015:

The reality is that it is twice as oppressive as being just a Native person. I feel like there’s so much pressure on young Native people to rise to a certain occasion or level of being or just adulthood…I don’t know what it is, but there’s all this pressure to be something that I don’t feel like we’re necessarily meant to be. It might be capturing the American Dream, or go to college and get your master’s in oil engineering, and there’s these things that our parents or the generation before have been trained or conditioned to do for so many years. Now, I feel like because we’re in a current state of society [where] people are having difficulty deciding what exactly they want to do, with that comes more pressure.

VICE‘s Creators Project touched on Fragua’s recent activist work in an article late last year:

The artistic abilities Fragua honed with graffiti eventually pushed him toward activist endeavors. “I came into the social justice sector by accident. A friend of mine asked me to help him make a banner for a specific Native organization fighting for water rights in Northern Arizona. This was 2007. Since then, I have been creating art every year for different indigenous campaigns and struggles, separate from the art I create for myself.” This past summer, Fragua traveled to North Dakota to help fight the Dakota Access Pipeline. “Part of my role there was to educate about art as a visual communication through non-violent direct action. The banner was created for an action that was deployed the morning after I arrived,” says Fragua.

Visit Jaque Fragua’s artist page to learn more about his work.

Broken Boxes: Final Walk-Through

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Join Ginger Dunnill, curator of the Broken Boxes group exhibition at form & concept, for an interactive walk-through on the show’s final weekend. Broken Boxes features the art and ideas of over 40 visual artists, filmmakers, sound artists, activists, performance artists and community organizers from around the world who are effecting change through their work. The show is co-curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, and all invited artists have participated in an interview on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast over the past 2 years. The walk-through takes place on Saturday, October 21 from 1-3 pm. The Broken Boxes catalog, launched at an event this September, will be available for sale.

Learn more about the Broken Boxes exhibition.

Teaser: Broken Boxes | Kim Werner

“Even if your intentions are so the best on trying to ‘save’ something, if you don’t have a personal connection to it, if you don’t know it the way that I know it, don’t just go draw a circle around a map and say, ‘This is going to be a marine sanctuary.’ It’s like, ‘No, that doesn’t make any sense.’ It just goes to show why we need to all have conversations.”

-Kim Werner

Broken Boxes, an exhibition curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, features Kim Werner and 40 other creators from around the world who are effecting change in their work. All of the participants have appeared on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast.

There will be a catalog realease event at form & concept on Friday, September 29 from 5-7 pm. Click here to learn more, and make sure to RSVP on Facebook.

This Friday: Broken Boxes Catalog Release

Broken Boxes Catalog Release Event- September 2017- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Broken Boxes Catalog cover.

form & concept’s Broken Boxes exhibition, curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger and featuring 40 activist artists, has received some stellar press in the past few weeks. Look below for quotes and links, and make sure to attend tomorrow evening’s Broken Boxes Catalog Release Event (9/29, 5-7 pm). The evening includes public engagement by participating artists Demian DinéYazhi’ and JESS X SNOW, a film screening of AFTER EARTH directed by JESS X SNOW, and a performance of 1000 Tiny Mirrors, a collaborative experimental trans*/queer rock project presented by Frexy.

Jess X Snow Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Jess X. Snow, TO SURVIVE, I TURNED MY BODY INTO A PRAYER FOR THE EARTH II, photograph with poem, 11 x 17 in.

“When it comes to art and activism, finding the necessary questions can be as difficult—and as messy—as searching for answers. This exhibition asks visitors to take time to engage in that messy work alongside the artists.”
Stacy Pratt, First American Art Magazine

Maria Hupfield Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Maria Hupfield, In Case of Emergency, found objects and industrial felt, 11.75 x 18.5 x 3.25 in.

“I believe that everything you do in your artistic practice should integrate a form of giving back, and that is powerful activism.”
Ginger Dunnill talks to Hello Giggles

Thomas Marcus Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Thomas ‘BREEZE’ Marcus, Tribal Territory, oil, ink, aerosol, 36 x 36 in.

“Dunnill says the catalogs are gorgeous, but extremely limited (there will only be about 50 copies available when all is said and done), and, at just $20, they’re a steal.”
Alex De Vore, Santa Fe Reporter’s “Pick of the Week”

Learn more on our website.
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Teaser: Broken Boxes | Miyuki Baker

“We can put ourselves out there and try our hardest, and work really, really passionately about the things that we love and care about. But […] the minute we start to latch onto what that might turn into, I think that’s when we start to lose the potency.”

-Miyuki Baker

Broken Boxes, an exhibition curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, features Miyuki Baker and 40 other creators from around the world who are effecting change in their work. All of the participants have appeared on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast.

There will be a catalog realease event at form & concept on Friday, September 29 from 5-7 pm. Click here to learn more, and make sure to RSVP on Facebook.

Time to break the box.

JESS X SNOW Art- Broken Boxes Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
JESS X SNOW, TO SURVIVE, I TURNED MY BODY INTO A PRAYER FOR THE EARTH, digital photography and poetry.

It’s opening weekend of Broken Boxes, an exhibition featuring the art and ideas of over 40 visual artists, filmmakers, sound artists, activists, performance artists and community organizers from around the world who are effecting change through their work. The show is co-curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, and all invited artists have participated in an interview on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast over the past 2 years. Here’s Megan Bennett’s take on the show from today’s Albuquerque Journal North:

 Ian Kuali'i Art- Broken Boxes Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Ian Kuali’i, For They Know Not What They Do/Those Who Don’t, hand-cut paper and mixed media.

A local podcaster is giving a platform to artists from outside society’s mainstream experience through a gallery exhibition starting this evening.

The exhibition, titled “Broken Boxes” after Ginger Dunnill’s podcast of the same name, is displaying work from some of the people Dunnill has interviewed since starting her show in 2014. All the artists, activists or community organizers involved in the show are either Native American, queer-identifying or non-binary, transgender, women, or people of color.

“My main focus for the podcast is to celebrate artists that are outside of the scope of the cis(gender) white male format that is really prevalent in the art world,” said Dunnill, who is co-curating the show with husband and Native artist Cannupa Hanska Luger.

“I wanted to celebrate … people who are doing the really important work in society and often don’t get to share their stories in a personal way with community members that can really benefit from hearing what their work is doing,” she said.

Click here to read the rest of the article. Michael Abatemarco covered Broken Boxes in Pasatiempo‘s Mixed Media column:

Valentina Gonzalez Art- Broken Boxes Exhibition- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Valentina Gonzalez, Cultural Value-vs-Property Value, 2017, aerosol paint and wood.

[Broken Boxes is] a good adjunct to the Native arts festivals happening around town this weekend, providing a look at some of the more challenging and cutting-edge works done by Native and non-Native artists alike. “I am interested in creating content that honors the intersections where our stories overlap, and which refuses to box us out of each other’s narratives,” said Dunnill in a statement.

Click here to read the full column, and join us for the Broken Boxes opening weekend events on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Tonight’s opening reception (8/18, 5-8 pm) features an appearance by Winona LaDuke of Honor the Earth and documentarian Keri Pickett. A traveling show called Art of the Indigenous Resistance, curated by Kim Smith, fills the downstairs of our atrium. Broken Boxes spans our top floor, anchored by monumental installations by Chip Thomas, Nani Chacon and Demian DinéYazhi’. Get all the details on the Broken Boxes exhibition page, and make sure to RSVP for opening weekend on Facebook.

Teaser: Broken Boxes | Douglas Miles

“As an artist, it’s just you and the work, you and your own ability to express what’s flowing through you at that moment. At that time […] you don’t know, but you might help someone.”

-Douglas Miles

Broken Boxes, an exhibition curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, features Douglas Miles and 40 other creators from around the world who are affecting change in their work. All of the participants have appeared on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast. The show opens at form & concept on Friday, August 18 from 5-7 pm. Click here to learn more, and make sure to RSVP on Facebook.

Teaser: Broken Boxes | Demian DinéYazhi’

“I feel like what I’m trying to do with my art education is figure out ways that Indigenous culture can evolve, and Indigenous artwork can evolve. I think that’s very important, because that’s a huge part of our culture. For some ridiculous reason, we just got lumped into Indigenous art, we just got lumped into anthropological ways of showing our culture.”

-Demian DinéYazhi’

Broken Boxes, an exhibition curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, features Demian DinéYazhi’ and 40 other creators from around the world who are affecting change in their work. All of the participants have appeared on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast. The show opens at form & concept on Friday, August 18 from 5-7 pm. Click here to learn more, and make sure to RSVP on Facebook.