Artist Talk: Hand / Eye

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Join us for a interactive tour of the Hand/Eye group exhibition, featuring a number of the featured artists. Hand/Eye is an exhibition of ten artists from across the United States who merge photography and craft mediums. The artworks in the show incorporate a wide array of materials—fiber, cast glass, micaceous clay, human hair—that shatter the picture plane and push photographic imagery into the real world.

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Opening: Hand / Eye

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Whether they’re gelatin silver prints or daguerreotypes, there’s one thing that most all photographs have in common: they’re flat. For a new group exhibition at form & concept, ten artists from across the United States shatter this convention by applying craft media to photography—and vice versa. Hand/Eye presents images with the texture and volume of sculptures, vaulting a medium that’s often trapped behind glass into the viewer’s sphere.

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Video: Murals of Tibet

Thomas Laird, the photographer behind the new TASCHEN book Murals of Tibet, will appear at form & concept this Friday at 5 pm for a special event. He’ll talk about his journey of over ten years to create this stunning archive of Tibetan Buddhist art, and offer visitors an intimate look at the SUMO-sized Collector’s Edition of the book. Murals of Tibet has been on display in the gallery’s atrium since early July, and Laird’s appearance marks its final day here.

Ahead of the event, check out this incredible video series by TASCHEN about the creation of Murals of Tibet. Above, TASCHEN introduces the book in spectacular fashion. Here’s an excerpt from the narration:

For centuries, Tibet has been seen as an island in the sky. A remote land, close to the lights, beyond the mountains. A mysterious land, where monks practiced rituals and yoga that led to wisdom and power. What if, even in our age of increased accessibility, a great treasure still remained—hidden all of these centuries? Visions from another world. Visions created to inspire, as Tibetans say, liberation upon seeing.

Over the course of five expeditions, and using multi-image capture and render technology, Thomas Laird amassed the first catalog of life-size images of more than 200 Buddhist mural masterpieces—including the oldest and most important painted during the past 1,000 years.

In this “making of” video, the editorial team discusses the design process. Managing Editor Florian Kobel says:

The murals can now be appreciated much better than on site. They have never been explored to the extent as they have been now, because the walls are 9 meters high, the lighting is terrible. You never were able to look up and study the faces.

Frank Goerhardt, TASCHEN’s global publishing director, continues:

You cannot get the picture with one photograph. It is a sum of pictures taken digitally and stitched together.

Laird sat down with Richard Gere at the Explorers Club in New York for a conversation about the making of the book. Here’s what he had to say:

I spend the day shooting hundreds of images. That’s a lovely day in Tibet, in a dark room. […] You see the Buddha when you’re done that day, but you also have a headache. Then you bring that home, and you sit down in front of a computer, and your wife puts up with you for a month or six weeks. Then you say to her, ‘It’s very nice, but it’s not proper… so I need to go back to Tibet to recapture this.

Come meet Laird and learn more about Murals of Tibet on Saturday. This event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited so make sure to arrive early.

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Emily Mason | Strangers Collective: Mirror Box

“I think I’m trying to create a sense of familiarity, but in a total otherworldly way.” – Emily Mason

Photographer Emily Mason makes images of her surroundings, collages them onto sculptural props, and photographs the finished assemblages to create images that flicker between dimensionality and abstraction.

Kyle Farrell, Alex Gill and Jordan Eddy, co-directors of Strangers Collective and the No Land art space, curate this exhibition of emerging artists and writers at form & concept. Mirror Box represents a network of early career creatives, starting in Santa Fe and spiraling across the nation. Its curatorial throughline presents a radical method for reflecting on place and identity through art objects.

The term “mirror box” originates in the medical field: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran invented the box with two back-to-back mirrors in the center to help amputees manage phantom limb pain. The patient places the “good” limb into one side, and the “residual” limb into the other, making mirrored movements that can trick the brain into believing that it’s moving the phantom limb. “It’s a tribute to the incredible power of grey matter,” says Eddy. “If our minds are capable of conjuring a nervous system from thin air, can we link up with people, places or things in the same visceral but invisible way?” The curatorial team realized that art, like the mirror box, can act as a conduit for this type of transcendent—but also highly tangible—experience.

Learn more about the exhibition.

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RSVP for Zine Reading.

RSVP for Closing Reception and Performance by Emmaly Wiederholt.

Teaser: Broken Boxes | Cara Romero

“Indigenous people are artists. We look at the world in a different way and we see beauty in everything. We’re tied to the mediums that we’re using. We’re putting our hands in clay and we’re stripping willows to make things. We’re sewing regalia. We’re touching these objects of our ancestors and we’re talking to our ancestors.”

– Cara Romero

Broken Boxes, an exhibition curated by Ginger Dunnill and Cannupa Hanska Luger, features Cara Romero and 40 other creators from around the world who are effecting change in their work. All of the participants have appeared on Dunnill’s Broken Boxes Podcast.

There will be a catalog realease event at form & concept on Friday, September 29 from 5-7 pm. Click here to learn more, and make sure to RSVP on Facebook.