Reception & Live Auction: Guns to Art Benefit Show

Decommissioned firearms aren’t the most pliable artistic medium, but that hasn’t stopped faculty and students at Santa Fe Community College from reshaping them into stunning artworks. They’ve been hard at work bending, slicing, shredding and melting old guns into sculptures, jewelry and even apparel. This fall, the art will appear at a special reception, live auction and silent auction in support of in support of art and welding scholarships at SFCC and the 501(c)3 non-partisan organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV), along with juried works by artists from across the world that reflect on gun violence prevention. The Guns to Art Benefit Show runs November 7-17 at form & concept, with a reception and live auction on Friday, November 17 from 4 to 7 pm.

Learn more on the exhibition page.
Enter the Guns to Art juried show.

Call for Entries: Guns to Art Benefit Show

Guns to Art Benefit Show

Submission Deadline: Monday, October 9, 2017, 11:59 pm
Submit To: submissions@formandconcept.center
Click here to download the submission form.

form & concept gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico collaborates with Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) and the non-partisan 501(c)3 organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV) for this special exhibition. Silent and live auctions at the reception will feature artwork made from decommissioned firearms by faculty and students of SFCC’s Art Department, along with works reflecting on gun violence prevention by artists and jewelers from across the United States. Proceeds will benefit art and welding scholarships at SFCC, NMPGV and the participating artists. The Guns to Art Benefit Show will be on view from November 7 to 17, 2017, with a reception and live auction on Friday, November 17, 2017 from 4-7 pm. An online and in-gallery silent auction featuring a selection of the works will run for the duration of the exhibition, and end on the evening of the reception.

Artists are invited to enter up to three works, the submission form and a 250-word artist statement describing how each submission reflects on gun violence prevention. Please provide a high resolution image of each work. Entries can be artworks or jewelry of any size or medium, and don’t need to incorporate decommissioned gun parts to be considered. The submission deadline is October 9, after which a jury selected by form & concept will choose the works and notify the artists by October 20. Upon notification, the artists will receive a contract that they must sign, scan and email back to form & concept (submissions@formandconcept.center) before shipping their work. Selected artists are expected to cover the costs of shipping their work to the gallery, and to enclose a return shipping label from FedEx or UPS in the case of a work not selling.

The works will appear in an online and in-gallery silent auction that begins November 7 ends at the conclusion of the Guns to Art Benefit Show on November 17. Works that do not appear in the silent auction will be on the block in a live auction at the event. Participating artists will be notified before the Guns to Art Benefit Show opens whether their work will be in the silent or live auctions. 50% of each sale will go to the participating artist, 25% will go to NMPGV and the SFCC Art Department’s scholarship program, and 25% will go to form & concept gallery.

Please email high resolution images, a 250-word artist statement and the submission form to submissions@formandconcept.center by October 9 to be considered for the Guns to Art Benefit Show.

To Submit:

-Deadline for submissions is Monday, October 9 at 11:59 pm.
-Submissions should be sent to submissions@formandconcept.center.
-Artists must fill out the official submission form in order to be considered.
-Artists are invited to submit up to three works of art or jewelry. Please provide a high resolution image of each work. File size should be no larger than 6 MB per file, JPGs preferred.
-Entries can be artworks or jewelry of any size or medium, and do NOT need to incorporate decommissioned gun parts to be considered.
-Submissions should reflect on gun violence prevention. A 250-word artist statement must accompany the work(s), describing how the work(s) fit with the theme. Please provide only one artist statement, even if you submit multiple works.
-Artists will be notified if their work is selected by the jury by October 20, and will be expected to sign and return form & concept’s contract (submissions@formandconcept.center) before shipping the artwork.
-Artists are expected to cover the shipping costs of their work, and provide a FedEx or UPS shipping label for return shipping in case of an unsold work. Selected artworks may be hand-delivered to the gallery.

If Selected:

-50% of each sale will go to the artist, 25% will go to New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence and the Santa Fe Community College Art Department’s scholarship program, and 25% will go to form & concept gallery.
-Work should arrive at form & concept gallery by no later than November 3 at 5:00 pm.
-The Guns to Art Benefit Show will be on view from November 7 to 17, 2017, with a reception and live auction on November 17, 2017 from 4-7 pm.
-An online and in-gallery silent auction featuring a display of selected works will run for the duration of the exhibition, and end on the evening of the reception.

Timeline:

Submission Deadline: Monday, October 9, 2017, 11:59 pm
Selected Artists Notified: Friday, October 20, 2017
Artwork Arrival Deadline: Friday, November 3, 2017, 5:00 pm
Exhibition Dates: November 7-17, 2017
Reception & Live Auction: Friday, November 17, 2017, 4-7 pm

Mayor’s Arts Awards 2017

Sandy Zane- Form & Concept Gallery- Mayor's Arts Awards 2017- Javier Gonzales- Santa Fe New Mexico

Our very own Sandy Zane is a recipient of the 2017 Mayor’s Arts Awards. She will be honored by Mayor Javier Gonzales at a ceremony next month. Here’s an excerpt from Megan Bennett’s write-up on this year’s award recipients in Albuquerque Journal North:

Along with being a gallery owner, Sandy Zane is serving on boards at Creative Santa Fe, Creative Startups and the Santa Fe Community College Foundation, where she heads the Art on Campus Committee. She has also sponsored Currents New Media nearly every year. She also supports the New Mexico School for the Arts.

“I’ve always been passionate about whatever it is I’m doing,” said Zane about why she enjoys giving back to the Santa Fe arts scene. “I don’t like to do anything halfway.”‘

Read the full article here.

Call for Entries: Guns to Art Benefit Show

New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence- Guns to Art Benefit Show- form & concept gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Calling all artists, designers and craftspeople! We’re looking for artwork and jewelry that reflects on gun violence prevention for this November’s Guns to Art Benefit Show at form & concept. The two-week exhibition was inspired by an ongoing collaboration between the non-partisan 501(c)3 organization New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence (NMPGV) and the Santa Fe Community College Art Department (SFCC).

In August 2016, NMPGV launched a gun buyback program that invited gun owners to anonymously turn in unwanted firearms to New Mexico law enforcement. SFCC’s Art Department offered to turn part of the stockpile into art, and a collaboration with the Colorado-based RAWTools project called “Guns to Gardens” transformed some of the guns into gardening tools. Creations from both programs will appear in live and silent auctions at the Guns to Art Benefit Show reception on Friday, November 17.

We’re also inviting artists from around the world to submit up to three pieces of art or jewelry for potential inclusion in the show. The deadline for submissions is October 9, after which a jury will select works and notify the artists by October 20. The works will be on view in the Guns to Art Benefit Show from November 7 to 17. Proceeds from sales  will go to the participating artists, NMPGV, SFCC’s art and welding scholarship program and form & concept. Learn more at the links below, and make sure to submit!

Read the submission guidelines & download the submission form.
Learn more about the Guns to Art Benefit Show.

Preview | Jared Weiss: He’s Either Or It Was His Birthday

Jared Weiss has forgotten much of his subject matter. Or rather, the scenes that he paints are often buried somewhere deep in his unconscious. Reviving suppressed memories can be a dangerous game, but the Santa Fe artist has some heavy hitters on his side: Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan and Slavoj Žižek.

Weiss draws inspiration from the famous line of psychoanalysts in his new solo exhibition at form & concept, He’s Either Dead or It Was His Birthday. Opening Friday, June 30, the show conjures a strange sense of déjà vu. Weiss’s figurative images—which resemble warped photographs from a massive theater production—are sure to lodge in the back of your mind. The exhibition opens Friday, June 30, 5-7 pm and runs through August 12, 2017. Read our interview with Weiss below, and make sure to RSVP for the reception.

Jared Weiss Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

You lived in Santa Fe previously, and then you left for a few years. What were you up to before returning in 2015? 

I was living in San Francisco for 2 years, and going to grad school. It’s kind of scary, just how forward-thinking the tech industry is, and how with that comes not really caring about anything old. Painting being one of those things.

Young tech people aren’t collecting paintings, they’re collecting yachts.

That’s totally true. I really felt unsupported, unfulfilled. I mean, school was great in a lot of ways. The community in San Francisco is just such a weird, alien place. I had to get the hell out.

How did graduate school affect your art?

It was a great experience. It was an awful experience. The biggest thing that I came away with was that I wasn’t making the work that I’d wanted to make for a very long time. I just didn’t know how. They just squeeze you and put you in corners all the time, and you have to make fight-or-flight decisions.

Really, I was afraid for the longest time. I didn’t think that my life would be interesting. Before, I was painting from photographs of people I never knew, and would never know. I found that very interesting because it’s something you can never get to, so you’re projecting.

I just slowly came to the realization that, in fact, I can paint my life. It will be interesting.

Jared Weiss Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

How did you feel coming back? Do you think it’s changed here?

Definitely. There are a lot more young people here. There’s a lot more art events happening. 

Tell us about where you grew up. 

I’m from the Midwest. I’m also kinda done with the Midwest. Terrified of the Midwest.

And yet you return to it quite often in your work.

Yeah, it’s kind of a study on the terrifying nature of it. Very subtle.

Are you still figuring out what’s going to be in the show?

I have a pretty definite idea. The work has gotten very indebted to psychoanalysis, particularly the work of Freud, Lacan, and Žižek.

The key thread through all of it is this idea of a screen memory, which appears in an old Freudian essay. He talks about any kind of experience that threatens to overwhelm the psyche, particularly trauma or a new experience that’s too overwhelming to integrate. You can repress that as a defense mechanism, but it’s still there, buried somewhere in your psyche. In order to integrate it, you collage other memories on top of it that are similar.

Jared Weiss Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

A real memory is replaced by something brighter and shinier. 

Yes, you have this kind of veneer on top that’s a fiction. It’s not a true experience, but it becomes more real somehow. In my work, the surface of the painting becomes this screen.

Are you using your own memories as subject matter?

Yes. For example, I grew up on this lumber yard, and I go back to this space. I’m using it as kind of a stage where I can cast people I know now as characters.

I like this idea of people seeing a painting and feeling like they’ve seen it before, but they really haven’t.

What inspires the titles of your paintings? 

Mainly, I pick titles to confuse the experience. They’re like red herrings in a way. They point away from this thing, in a way that makes it palatable and safe. It gives things a semblance of friendliness.

Jared Weiss Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

The people in your paintings often look familiar, but their features are just fuzzy enough that they also seem like strangers.  

That’s definitely intended. I want it to be obstructed to the point where you feel like there’s a similarity. There’s an entry point through yourself where you can project the people you know onto the figures. The Anywhere, America quality of the space and the potential knowability of the people is very intentional.

How do you choose your palette? 

In Freud’s essay about screen memories, he talks about this memory he has. All he can remember is these incredibly yellow sunflowers. He tries to dig into all these associations with people that he knew and decisions that he made in his life, which are hidden underneath the memory of the sunflower.

The yellow of a sunflower, this hallucinatory, really amped-up yellow, is kind of what inspired the palette. You exaggerate in order to be able to remember things. 

Are your paintings entirely rooted in the past?

As much as I speak about memory, the work is very much about reconstructing my life now. Pointing to this place that I’m from, but making it so it’s never in the past. It’s always this “now” moment. Painting has so many similarities with life. Good painting is always alive.

Jared Weiss Artwork- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Join us for the opening reception of Jared Weiss: He’s Either Dead Or It Was His Birthday on Friday, June 30, 5-7 pm. The show opens concurrently with another painting exhibition, Rebecca Rutstein: Fault Lines. Click here to read our blog preview of Rutstein’s show.

Artwork:

1. Jared Weiss, I Was Saying It Outright,  oil on canvas, 74 x 54 in.
2. Jared Weiss, Bad Maps, oil on canvas, 48 x 36 in.
3. Jared Weiss, In That Case, I Had a Wonderful Time, oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in.
4. Jared Weiss, This Is Only a Little of It, oil on canvas, 18 x 14 in.
5. Jared Weiss, Islands Are Not Forever, oil on canvas, 12 x 12 in.

Coming Soon: Deliberate Acts.

Kristen Roles- SITE Scholars- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Kristen Roles, I Don’t Know a Thing About You (Suddenly You Are All I Ever Knew), Inkjet prints on temporary tattoo paper adhered to and peeled from skin, thread, dimensions variable (tailored to space), 2016

SITE Santa Fe is undergoing a radical transformation this year. Come fall, the contemporary museum space will debut a renovated and expanded building that includes a brand new education wing, extra exhibition space and much more. In the meantime, SITE’s education department has been working on a different type of construction project. Their SITE Scholar program, which is in its 6th year, lays the foundations of art careers for undergraduate and graduate students from across the state.

Each year, SITE asks faculty members from diverse New Mexico institutions to nominate outstanding creative students for the program. The fifteen scholars that are selected gain access to an impressive array of art world resources and opportunities throughout the year. The program culminates in a group exhibition that’s usually held at SITE. In lieu of exhibiting in a construction zone, the 2016/17 scholars will take over form & concept’s ground floor to mount their show. It’s an exciting extension of the program, allowing the participants to gain experience in the gallery world as well as the museum world.

Eric-Paul Riege- SITE Scholars Program- Santa Fe New Mexico
Eric-Paul Riege, mixed media fabrics, fiberfill, turquoise, coral, wax string, wire, rope, 2017.

Deliberate Acts, the 2016/17 SITE Scholar exhibition, opens at form & concept on Friday, April 28, 5-7 pm. It features artwork by students from Santa Fe Community College, St. John’s College, Santa Fe University of Art and Design, Institute of American Indian Arts, University of New Mexico and New Mexico Highlands University. We’re so excited to host this emerging art project, particularly after working with the featured artists for the last few months to prepare for the show. Their passion is infectious, and their artistic voices are highly developed.

Many of the artists are exploring identity in fresh and exciting ways. Eric-Paul Riege, from University of New Mexico, made an enormous Dine’ jacla from mixed media fabrics and other materials. Attached to the sculpture is a turquoise necklace that Riege made, and a jacla that was passed down to him by his mother. Kristen Roles, who’s getting her MFA at UNM, captured the residue of memories by printing photographs and screenshots on temporary tattoo paper. Sarah Canelas of SFUAD created a multimedia installation by tearing pages out of a notebook, covering them in porcelain slip and firing them. The completed video piece shows a field of delicate, crumpled forms with a notebook in the middle that’s covered in confessional scrawls.

Sarah Canelas- SITE Scholars- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Sarah Canelas, again/how might we, multimedia (video, sound, porcelain), 2017.

Deliberate Acts is imbued with the crackling, contemporary energy of artists who are just starting their aesthetic explorations. Come experience the show at the opening reception on April 28, and join us for an artist talk on Saturday, April 29 from 2-3 pm. Click here to learn more about each of the 2016/17 SITE scholars.

RSVP for the Deliberate Acts opening reception.
RSVP for the artist talk.