Artist Talk: Six Years Smitten

Six Years Smitten reunites a dynamic range of artists, with over 70 participants in a cumulative exhibition of wearable artworks.  This will be the first long-term exhibition of Smitten Forum participants, and will also reunite several members of this remarkable community.

 

Every year since 2014, Marissa Saneholtz and Sara Brown have invited a new group of jewelers and metalsmiths to work side-by-side in a communal studio for a week. Over six years, the forum expanded in numbers and geographic area to encompass over 70 artists in several states.

 

Call it a mobile artist colony, a colorful social experiment, or a crafty piece of performance art. Invitees range from emerging to well-established jewelers who employ a stunning array of mediums and techniques—including casting, computer aided design, found object assemblage, powder coating, tin construction, traditional silversmithing, and welding.

 

 

Demonstration | Erik Gellert

“My works are cause and effect relationships in material form,” says artist Erik Gellert. “Their hand rolled nature gives each coil a slight irregularity and a distinction which informs the overall shape and patterns that comprise each work.”

 

Using hundreds of hand-rolled coils of clay, Gellert carefully layers the ribbons atop each other, creating a thick slab of undulating clay which protrudes and recedes into coral-like forms. The tendrils are then coated with acrylic paint to capture more vivid, varied color schemes than traditional ceramic processes can achieve.

 

This July, Gellert unravels the techniques, inspirations, and meaning behind his sculptures in a three hour hands-on demonstration in the form & concept atrium. Audience members will interact with and assist Gellert as he manipulates clay cords to form his quintessential sculptures. Alicia Bailey’s workshop on Innovative Folded Book Forms will be presented simultaneously, among the works of Superscript.

 

Erik Gellert

 

Erik Gellert is a contemporary ceramicist based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Inspired by contradictions, Gellert pairs slabs of clay formed into perfectly squared shapes with wild, rounded coils of clay which protrude and recede across smooth planes. The work’s hand-rolled nature creates a slight irregularity and a distinction which informs the overall shape and patterns that comprise each sculpture.

Opening: Summer Show

Every summer since its founding in 2016, form & concept has invited its dynamic team of represented artists to come together for a group exhibition of new works. Each show unites local and far-flung creative voices in a conversation about art, craft and design. form & concept seeks to examine the conceptual lines drawn between such broad categories, and how these distinctions reflect cultural attitudes toward gender, race, and class.  

 

The gallery, located in Santa Fe’s Railyard district, was voted “Best Gallery” by readers of the Santa Fe Reporter last year. In its short history, form & concept has curated a formidable array of exhibitions that aspire to give platforms to mediums and topics that have been largely overlooked or excluded by local and national art galleries. “The Summer Show is the singular exhibition where our ethos is most clearly on view,” Eddy says. “It’s the most diverse in terms of mediums, forms, and concepts. It’s bigger than just an exhibition. It’s our annual contribution to the contemporary art discourse of Santa Fe and beyond.”

 

The Summer Show is anchored by an immersive installation by Santa Fe artist Thais Mather. Large-scale watercolor figure paintings descend from the ceiling, cast with holographic prisms created by C. Alex Clark. The two mediums to bleed together, morphing what we believe into a suspensin of disbelief. “Perhaps the work is about a loss of perception of self; a melting,” Mather explains. “In this way, the transitional wave created by a prismatic breakdown of color works to dissolve perceived image. I felt somehow prismatic light was almost a breath, in it’s simplicity and utter complexity. What is light, what is breath?

 

Each represented artist will debut new works, including sculptures by Wesley Anderegg and Debra Baxter, as well as paintings by Heidi Brandow, Matthew Mullins, and Thais Mather.

Artist Talk: Ryan Singer | Childhood Mythologies

Ryan Singer hosts an artist talk for his solo exhibition, Childhood Mythologies on Saturday, March 30 from 2 to 3 pm. Childhood Mythologies showcases original narratives inspired by dreams and childhood memories while interweaving subtle sociopolitical commentary.

For Singer, the exhibition is an opportunity to showcase his paintings on a larger scale. Although the theme of Childhood Mythologies offered Singer the opportunity to touch on social issues, the artist is purposefully withholding commentary or explanation. “The paintings are different parts of my life, and I put them together like a puzzle,” the artist explains. “I think if I say too much it ruins it, so I leave it up to interpretation. I want other people to weave their own stories into it as well.”

 

RSVP for this event.

Learn more about the opening reception.

 

 

Curious Creations: Susan Aaron-Taylor

susan aaron taylor, fetch
Fetch, handmade felt, shell, beads, wood, 15 x 13 x 6 in

Fantastical creatures appear to Susan Aaron-Taylor in her dreams. In the waking hours, the Michigan artist brings them to life, stitching together a hide of handmade felt and an array of natural materials.

 

susan aaron taylor, pug, susan aaron taylor sculpture, susan aaron taylor form & concept
Pug, handmade felt, agate, wood, 9 x 11 x 15 in

 

Unified by Jungian philosophy,  Aaron-Taylor’s curious creations metamorphose animal forms with archetypal meaning.

The mixed-media sculptures simultaneously evoke universal and deeply personal themes, which Aaron-Taylor states, “chronicles the retrieval of these broken pieces of the Soul.”

 

susan aaron taylor, susan aaron taylor cat
Cat, handmade felt, porcupine quills, wood, 7 x 14 x 14 in

 

susan aaron taylor, susan aaron taylor tiger teapot
Tiger Teapot, felt, wood, geodes, porcupine quills, 12 x 19 x 10 in

Press Roundup: Nika Feldman | Spirits in the Material World

nika feldman crop top, nika feldman artist, nika feldman spirits in the material world, nika feldman art, nika feldman textiles, nika feldman t-shirts and pull tabls, form & concept nika feldman, form and concept nika feldman, form and concept spirits in the material world, santa fe gallery, santa fe form & concept, santa fe gallery nika feldmanCrop Top, recycled t-shirts & aluminum pull-tabs, embroidery, 32 x 50 in

 

Nika Feldman’s solo exhibition Spirits in the Material World opens Saturday, January 25 from 5-7 pm, coinciding with our sister gallery Zane Bennett Contemporary Art’s Stitched Ink. Both exhibitions deal with textiles, but with largely different implications.

“A culture’s clothing has its own language,” begins Megan Bennett of Albuquerque Journal’s write-up of Nika. “What that language is, or how cultural identities and values are reflected in garments, is what drives Nika Feldman’s work.” Bennett interviewed Feldman early this winter, excerpted here:

The pieces are intentionally made to be “garment-like” rather than actual clothing items, said Feldman, with the exception of an XXL black T-shirt she didn’t want to cut apart, and instead decorated with tabs and fringe tassles made from other shirts.

“When it’s artwork, people have to investigative, people have to go deeper into those narratives,” she said. “If it’s a wearable garment, it doesn’t go any farther than that. People see it as fashion, they want to know if it comes in their size, they want to know how much it is.”

 

nika feldman hooded cape, hooded cape nika feldman, nika feldman artist, nika feldman art, nika feldman form & concept, form & concept nika feldman, form and concept textils, form and concept gallery, santa fe galleries, santa fe gallery, new mexico galleryHooded Cape, recycled t-shirts & aluminum pull-tabs,embroidery, 50 x 40 in

 

Emily Van Cleve covered Spirits in the Material World in a feature on the Santa Fe Arts Journal. Here’s an excerpt:

 

“All around the world, people wear t-shirts,” says Feldman, a Santa Fe artist who moved to town from Nova Scotia at the end of 2017. “T-shirts were originally an undergarment. But now, through their logos, they inform others about the specific groups, companies, rock bands and organizations we like.” Feldman liked the idea of putting pull-tabs in her work for the same reasons she was drawn to t-shirts. They’re readily available. There’s an abundant supply of them. They’re also an integral part of Western culture.

 

nika feldman camo dress, nika feldman artist, nika feldman spirits in the material world, nika feldman art, nika feldman textiles, nika feldman t-shirts and pull tabs, form & concept nika feldman, form and concept nika feldman, form and concept spirits in the material world, santa fe gallery, santa fe form & concept, santa fe gallery nika feldmanCamo Dress, recycled t-shirts & aluminum pull-tabs,embroidery, 50 x 45 in

The Santa Fean also covered Spirits in the Material World for their Holiday Issue. Here’s an excerpt:

Nika Feldman describes herself as a textile artist, rag picker, and costume stenographer, and her job history includes stints in fashion design, social work, and sorting through clothing in a thrift store. Feldman weaves these disparate threads into a whole in the eight pieces displayed in Spirits in the Material World.

 

Spirits in the Material World opens January 25 and runs through March 23. Nika Feldman will conduct an Artist Talk on January 26 at 2 pm.

Artist Spotlight: Heidi Brandow

 

 

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Heidi Brandow, Margins, mixed media on panel, 18 x 24 in

 

“I knew from an early age that our native identity is so rich that we shouldn’t just hold it to a specific ceremony or spiritual practice,” Heidi Brandow said during a studio visit in 2016. “In my eyes, art is a tool that helps mark history, time, place and memory. Who’s to say pop culture are not equally as important as star sticks?”

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow daydreaming, heidi brandow octopus, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow artist, santa fe artist, form & concept, form and concept, santa fe artist, form and concept heidi brandow, form & concept heidi brandow, form & concept daydreamingDaydream, mixed media on panel, 5.5 x 12 x 1 in

Brandow’s works often feature whimsical monsters and characters against vividly colorful backdrops and paper collages she collects on her international travels.

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artist, picture of heidi brandow, heidi brandow artist picture, santa fe artist

 

Brandow was recently awarded the third Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists.

“As an artist with an active arts practice, a full-time commitment to the Institute of American Indian Arts, and a family,” says Heidi. “I am grateful for Ucross’ support in granting me the time, space, and resources to enhance my craft and create in such a beautiful setting.”

 

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Low Tide, mixed media painting, 5.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 in

 

To learn more about Heidi, please inquire or call us at (505) 216-1256.

Click here to view more works by Heidi Brandow in our collection.

Scroll below to read excerpts from our 2016 studio interview.

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow floating, floating heidi brandow, heidi brandow monsters, floating form & concept, floating form and concept, mixed media painting, moster painting

Floating, mixed-media on panel, 5 x 5 x 3 in

 

How does your own cultural heritage figure into your work? 

I never entered the art scene on the basis of promoting myself or my work as Native art. Not because I was shying away from it, but because my idea of Native art was a lot of very cultural referenced work, such as very specific tribal motifs and designs. The stuff that I was doing wasn’t like that. I never felt weird about it, because I always felt like my Native identity is already in this work, whether or not there’s symbols or direct references to cultural place. The simple fact that I’m Native and that this is the work that I’m making, there’s no way of denying my heritage and my experience, or saying that it’s not implicitly in the work. I don’t believe it has to have direct references to culture and place.

Culturally Native people are so diverse and our experience is so diverse. If you look at someone like myself, being Native Hawaiian and Navajo or Dinè, they’re two entirely different cultures. They’re both Native, but it’s ocean and desert people. That’s only the first difference, right? Of course we have a lot of similar cultural values, but it’s like night and day in a lot of ways.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artist, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow diptych, fences diptych, form and concept fences diptych, form & concept

Fences (diptych) mixed media painting, 5.5 x 11 x 1.5 in

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artsit, heidi brandow altin, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow altin art, form and concept altin, form & concept altin, form & concept altin heidi brandow

Altin, mixed-media, 5.5 x 12 x 1 in

Performance: NMSA First Thursdays / December

RSVP on Facebook.

New Mexico School for the Arts is in the midst of renovating and repurposing their new Railyard location, and they’re wasting no time injecting fresh creative energy into the arts district. The arts high school collaborates with form & concept on NMSA First Thursdays, a monthly performance series featuring new, experimental, and collaborative work by NMSA students and faculty. The series was co-founded by Kurt Isaacson, Hakim Bellamy, and Sandy Zane in spring of 2018, and has featured student performances from all five arts departments at NMSA: visual art, theater, dance, music, and creative writing.

Program

The Art of Text Painting

NMSA  students share both poetry and music inspired by their work on “text painting,” the technique of evoking the emotions present in musical composition. The evening will feature student readings and performances curated by Denise Hinson, Coordinator of Creative Writing, and supported by Darci Balkcom, Voice Instructor & Vocal Division Coordinator.

Opening: Hand / Eye

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Whether they’re gelatin silver prints or daguerreotypes, there’s one thing that most all photographs have in common: they’re flat. For a new group exhibition at form & concept, ten artists from across the United States shatter this convention by applying craft media to photography—and vice versa. Hand/Eye presents images with the texture and volume of sculptures, vaulting a medium that’s often trapped behind glass into the viewer’s sphere.

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This Friday: Hand/Eye

david samuel stern, nouri, form & concept, form and concept, form and concept gallery, santa fe gallert, craft photography, photography

 

Whether they’re gelatin silver prints or daguerreotypes, there’s one thing that most photographs have in common: they’re flat. For a new group exhibition at form & concept, eleven artists from across the United States shatter this convention by applying craft media to photography—and vice versa. Hand/Eye presents images with the texture and volume of sculptures, vaulting a medium that’s often trapped behind glass into the viewer’s sphere. The artworks in the show incorporate a wide array of materials, including fiber, cast glass, micaceous clay and human hair. Call it super-alternative process photography.

Above: David Samuel Stern, Nouri, photographic prints on translucent vellum physically cut and woven together.

 

 

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Cathryn Amidei
Gut Feeling
Fiber
25 x 44 in.

 

 

jodi colella, jodi colella artist, sampled lives, embroidery, embroidery art, craft photography, form & concept, form and concept, form and concept gallery

Jodi Colella
Sampled Lives series
embroidered found postcards
4 x 6 in. each

 

 

elizabeth claffey, elizabeth claffey artist, matrilinear, matrilinear #9, archival pigment print, form & concept, form and concept, hand/eye

Elizabeth Claffey
Matrilinear #9
archival pigment print
24 x 18 in.

 

jacquelyn royal, jacquelyn royal artist, needlepoint, needlepoint art, craft photography, embroidery art, hand/eye, form & concept, form and concept gallery, santa fe gallery, santa fe craft gallery, craft gallery

Jacquelyn Royal
Detroit 3
needlepoint, thread on canvas
11 x 16 in.

 

emily margarit mason, emily margarit mason artist, photography, craft photography, form and concept, form & concept, santa fe gallery, form and concept gallery, hand/eye, hand/eye group show

Emily Margarit Mason
Yoga Mat and Glass
photograph
36 x 24 in

 

Preview the show on our website.
RSVP on Facebook.

 

Introductions

kylee aragon, form & concept, form and concept gallery

We’re excited to announce that Kylee Aragon is our new Administrative Coordinator! Kylee was born and raised in Albuquerque, NM. She received a BFA in Art History from the University of New Mexico. Kylee began her gallery experience at Tamarind Institute, where she developed a deep love for works on paper. While Kylee is not a printmaker she is a self-proclaimed print nerd who enjoys speaking in great detail about process, paper, and the print market. She is excited to bring her passion for art to form & concept.