Ebb & Flow | Matthew Szösz

ouroboros matthew szöszOuroboros, glass, 14 x 24 x 2 4in

 

Most artists try to avoid failure. For Matthew Szösz, it’s a welcome occurrence. He estimates about 75 to 80 percent of his artworks break, but working through the process is the real reward for the glass artist.

The Seattle artist is all about experimentation. His oeuvre features unfathomable glass sculptures: woven structures and inflated forms that seem to defy the laws of physics.

floret matthew szösz, matthew szösz santa fe, matthew szösz

Floret, glass, 16 x 14 x 16 in

 

Matthew is fascinated by the properties of glass as it shifts from solid to liquid and back again. Successfully producing the conditions to reshape the medium is a process that demands scientific precision and bold experimentation.”

It’s a lot more like working with a partner than working with a material,” says Szösz of working with glass. “You’re not just imposing your idea on something else. There’s a response from the material that’s not necessarily predictable.”

 

matthew szöszMatthew Szösz photographed by Corning Museum of Glass.

His innovation earned him a spot in the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery exhibition 40 under 40: Craft Futures in 2012. His solo show, Minimal Tension, spanned form & concept’s ground floor last spring.

“If I wasn’t being surprised, I would get bored and stop playing around with it,” says Matthew. “That surprise, that thing where you create something that’s independent of you a little bit, where it’s as much a product of the material and circumstance that you set up as well as your own vision, that’s the thing that’s kind of exciting for me.”

matthew szösz untitled (inflatable) no. 81p

 

To learn more about Matthew, please contact us at 505-216-1256. Click here to view all works by Matthew Szösz in our collection.

Workshop: Nika Feldman | Tees & Tabs

PLEASE NOTE: This workshop is registration-only. Click here to save your spot.

Tees & Tabs Workshop

Saturday, March 16

Workshop Hours: 1-5 pm

Fee: $40 registration

In conjunction with the exhibition Spirits in the Material World, featuring a series of seven garment-like works made from recycled t-shirt fabric and aluminum can pull-tabs, Nika Feldman offers this special workshop. Participants will learn how to let these idiosyncratic materials direct their creative process. Feldman will teach basic embroidery techniques. All supplies included.

This class is limited to 20 participants, so make sure to register early! The $40 registration fee reserves your spot.

Click here to register.

Spirits in the Material World Events

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, January 26, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Tees & Tabs Workshop: Saturday, March 16, 1-5 pm | Register`

Opening: Lisa Klakulak | Since Taos

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Lisa Klakulak presents Since Taos: Contraction of Mass, Concision of Thought. The solo exhibition of 13 felt-based sculptures was created over a period of nearly two decades, since the freewheeling artist moved away from Taos, New Mexico in 2001. The collection simultaneously acts as a vivid portrait of Klakulak’s emotional journey and manifestation of her unique way of processing the world through fiber creations. “Like any piece of art you make, you are releasing an idea into the object,” Klakulak says. “It’s a completion of a certain cycle, and it’s interesting when someone on the other side spins it into their own emotive universe.” Klakulak’s work voices ideas about growth, human connection, mental stability, and the formation of personhood, as well as social commentary on issues of gender, income inequality, and culture.

Klakulak appears at a preview artist talk of Since Taos on Friday, February 22 from 4 to 5 pm. The opening reception directly follows, from 5 to 7 pm. The artist presents a registration-only felting workshop on February 23 and 24, 2019.

Learn more about this exhibition.

EVENTS

Preview Artist Talk: Friday, February 22, 4-5 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, February 22, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Felting Workshop: Feb. 23-24, $315 | Register Here.

Preview Artist Talk: Lisa Klakulak

RSVP on Facebook.

Lisa Klakulak appears at this special preview of Since Taos: Contraction of Mass, Concision of Thought, directly preceding the opening reception of the solo exhibition. The series of 13 felt-based sculptures was created over a period of nearly two decades, since the freewheeling artist moved away from Taos, New Mexico in 2001. Klakulak thinks of her life since that moment in distinct phases. “The works are all related to these leaps of faith that I have taken,” she says. “I want to think about, or articulate what I’m thinking about, in a manner that I can translate into a physical form.” Join her for an interactive tour of the show, just before its official debut.

Learn more about this exhibition.

EVENTS

Preview Artist Talk: Friday, February 22, 4-5 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, February 22, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Felting Workshop: Feb. 23-24, $315 | SOLD OUT.

Artist Talk: Nika Feldman | Spirits in the Material World

Nika Feldman hosts an artist talk for her solo exhibition Spirits in the Material World on Saturday, January 26 from 2 to 3 pm. Spirits in the Material World is an exploration of the coded language of garments, within Feldman’s native cultural context. The show’s title holds multiple references, one being as Feldman explains, “The belief that the spirits of both the maker and the wearer are held within a garment.” Another reference is to a song with the same name by The Police from the 1981 album Ghost in the Machine, which one could argue describes the unfortunate state of realities today. The underlying message within the song that resonates for Feldman is the description of a material culture, which is void of sacredness.

Learn more about this exhibition.

 

EVENTS

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, January 26, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Tees & Tabs Workshop: Saturday, March 16, 1-5 pm | Register

The Play Issue | Print Release Party & Fashion Show

Good Mood Studio, formerly known as 1905 Magazine, hosts a release party and fashion show for their winter release, The Play Issue. Directed by Keynan Johnson, the fashion show will echo the varied aesthetics and collaborative energy that has become synonymous with Good Mood Studio.

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Artist Spotlight: Heidi Brandow

 

 

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Heidi Brandow, Margins, mixed media on panel, 18 x 24 in

 

“I knew from an early age that our native identity is so rich that we shouldn’t just hold it to a specific ceremony or spiritual practice,” Heidi Brandow said during a studio visit in 2016. “In my eyes, art is a tool that helps mark history, time, place and memory. Who’s to say pop culture are not equally as important as star sticks?”

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow daydreaming, heidi brandow octopus, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow artist, santa fe artist, form & concept, form and concept, santa fe artist, form and concept heidi brandow, form & concept heidi brandow, form & concept daydreamingDaydream, mixed media on panel, 5.5 x 12 x 1 in

Brandow’s works often feature whimsical monsters and characters against vividly colorful backdrops and paper collages she collects on her international travels.

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artist, picture of heidi brandow, heidi brandow artist picture, santa fe artist

 

Brandow was recently awarded the third Ucross Fellowship for Native American Visual Artists.

“As an artist with an active arts practice, a full-time commitment to the Institute of American Indian Arts, and a family,” says Heidi. “I am grateful for Ucross’ support in granting me the time, space, and resources to enhance my craft and create in such a beautiful setting.”

 

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Low Tide, mixed media painting, 5.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 in

 

To learn more about Heidi, please inquire or call us at (505) 216-1256.

Click here to view more works by Heidi Brandow in our collection.

Scroll below to read excerpts from our 2016 studio interview.

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow floating, floating heidi brandow, heidi brandow monsters, floating form & concept, floating form and concept, mixed media painting, moster painting

Floating, mixed-media on panel, 5 x 5 x 3 in

 

How does your own cultural heritage figure into your work? 

I never entered the art scene on the basis of promoting myself or my work as Native art. Not because I was shying away from it, but because my idea of Native art was a lot of very cultural referenced work, such as very specific tribal motifs and designs. The stuff that I was doing wasn’t like that. I never felt weird about it, because I always felt like my Native identity is already in this work, whether or not there’s symbols or direct references to cultural place. The simple fact that I’m Native and that this is the work that I’m making, there’s no way of denying my heritage and my experience, or saying that it’s not implicitly in the work. I don’t believe it has to have direct references to culture and place.

Culturally Native people are so diverse and our experience is so diverse. If you look at someone like myself, being Native Hawaiian and Navajo or Dinè, they’re two entirely different cultures. They’re both Native, but it’s ocean and desert people. That’s only the first difference, right? Of course we have a lot of similar cultural values, but it’s like night and day in a lot of ways.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artist, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow diptych, fences diptych, form and concept fences diptych, form & concept

Fences (diptych) mixed media painting, 5.5 x 11 x 1.5 in

 

Do the monsters have names, or story lines? 

For me personally, they don’t have names, and there’s no story behind any of them. I try not to put too much of my own self into them. I don’t want to over personalize it. These are a nice outlet for me to create work that is lighthearted, that is easy. It’s very fluid. I feel like when people see it, they get it immediately. Whether you like it or you don’t like it, it’s a visceral thing. It’s not too theory-based.

I want my work to reach everyone. I don’t come from a community or people that are heavy academicians. In fact, I would argue that the art world has largely blocked out people of color from participating in art to a large extent.

On the other hand, I think a lot of the work I do is a little heavier. This is a nice outlet, where I can just make work that is more lighthearted and fun.

 

heidi brandow, heidi k brandow, heidi brandow artsit, heidi brandow altin, heidi brandow art, heidi brandow altin art, form and concept altin, form & concept altin, form & concept altin heidi brandow

Altin, mixed-media, 5.5 x 12 x 1 in

Performance: NMSA First Thursdays / December

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New Mexico School for the Arts is in the midst of renovating and repurposing their new Railyard location, and they’re wasting no time injecting fresh creative energy into the arts district. The arts high school collaborates with form & concept on NMSA First Thursdays, a monthly performance series featuring new, experimental, and collaborative work by NMSA students and faculty. The series was co-founded by Kurt Isaacson, Hakim Bellamy, and Sandy Zane in spring of 2018, and has featured student performances from all five arts departments at NMSA: visual art, theater, dance, music, and creative writing.

Program

The Art of Text Painting

NMSA  students share both poetry and music inspired by their work on “text painting,” the technique of evoking the emotions present in musical composition. The evening will feature student readings and performances curated by Denise Hinson, Coordinator of Creative Writing, and supported by Darci Balkcom, Voice Instructor & Vocal Division Coordinator.

Opening: MICROCOSM Small Works Show

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form & concept presents the second annual MICROCOSM group exhibition. The gallery invited all-star artists from its 2018 shows to make works measuring 8 x 10 inches or smaller. It’s form & concept’s final statement of the year, reflecting the variety of mediums and messages that graced the walls. MICROCOSM will feature far-flung creators who work in clay, glass, fiber, precious metals, and camera film—among many other materials.

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