Workshop: Nika Feldman | Tees & Tabs

PLEASE NOTE: This workshop is registration-only. Click here to save your spot.

Tees & Tabs Workshop

Saturday, March 16

Workshop Hours: 1-5 pm

Fee: $40 registration

In conjunction with the exhibition Spirits in the Material World, featuring a series of seven garment-like works made from recycled t-shirt fabric and aluminum can pull-tabs, Nika Feldman offers this special workshop. Participants will learn how to let these idiosyncratic materials direct their creative process. Feldman will teach basic embroidery techniques. All supplies included.

This class is limited to 20 participants, so make sure to register early! The $40 registration fee reserves your spot.

Click here to register.

Spirits in the Material World Events

Opening Reception: Friday, January 25, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Artist Talk: Saturday, January 26, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook
Tees & Tabs Workshop: Saturday, March 16, 1-5 pm | Register`

Opening: Lisa Klakulak | Since Taos

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Lisa Klakulak presents Since Taos: Contraction of Mass, Concision of Thought. The solo exhibition of 13 felt-based sculptures was created over a period of nearly two decades, since the freewheeling artist moved away from Taos, New Mexico in 2001. The collection simultaneously acts as a vivid portrait of Klakulak’s emotional journey and manifestation of her unique way of processing the world through fiber creations. “Like any piece of art you make, you are releasing an idea into the object,” Klakulak says. “It’s a completion of a certain cycle, and it’s interesting when someone on the other side spins it into their own emotive universe.” Klakulak’s work voices ideas about growth, human connection, mental stability, and the formation of personhood, as well as social commentary on issues of gender, income inequality, and culture.

Klakulak appears at a preview artist talk of Since Taos on Friday, February 22 from 4 to 5 pm. The opening reception directly follows, from 5 to 7 pm. The artist presents a registration-only felting workshop on February 23 and 24, 2019.

Learn more about this exhibition.

EVENTS

Preview Artist Talk: Friday, February 22, 4-5 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, February 22, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Felting Workshop: Feb. 23-24, $315 | Register Here.

Call for Artists: Beyond Punch Cards

Click here to learn more & submit.

Show dates: May 31-July 13, 2019
Submission deadline: February 25, 2019

EXHIBITION

The group exhibition Beyond Punch Cards offers an unexpected perspective on the relationship between textiles and technology. Curated by Francesca Rodriguez Sawaya and Renata de Carvalho Gaui of the ‘Weaving to Code, Coding to Weave’ project, the show unites an international group of artists to challenge common perceptions of both weaving and coding practices. Hosted by form & concept gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the show is an official satellite exhibition of this year’s CURRENTS New Media Festival, an international showcase for new media artists that occupies El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe for two weeks each June.

Beyond Punch Cards appears at form & concept from May 31 to July 13, 2019. Rodriguez Sawaya and Carvalho Gaui will select a number of artists through an invitational process, but are also searching beyond their networks with this call for artists. Entries may be submitted through this Google form from February 5 through February 25, 2019.

ABSTRACT

“The analytical engine will weave algebraic patterns like jacquard looms weave flowers and leaves.”
– Ada Lovelace, mathematician & creator of the first computational algorithm

The first-ever computational algorithm was inspired by the Jacquard loom’s punch card system for weaving patterns. Since that pivotal “under/over” moment, artists, designers and technologists from across the globe have awed us by creatively exploring the links between weaving and coding. As a home of age-old weaving traditions and a more recent haven for new media artists, the Desert Southwest is fertile ground for an exhibition that conceptually interlaces these practices.

The ‘Weaving to Code, Coding to Weave’ project traveled to Santa Fe in 2018 to facilitate a workshop for the CURRENTS New Media Festival. The class reinforced their awareness of the established intersection between weaving and coding, as many of the weavers that attended were already familiar with the links between the practices. Partway through the workshop, the facilitators pivoted their lesson plan to radical case studies, exposing attendees to projects that re-imagine the relationship between textiles and technology.

This experience informed the development of Beyond Punch Cards. The curators ask, how can weaving and coding present new paradigms for viewing the world around us? How can they illustrate different identities, or keep cultures and history alive? Can these practices converge and evolve to resist obsolescence?

Through this exhibition, Rodriguez Sawaya and Renata de Carvalho Gaui hope to inspire audiences, showcasing projects that use technology to explore the contemporary significance of weaving.

ELIGIBILITY

This submission process is open to any and all artists who explore weaving and coding through their work. There is no entry fee. You may enter up to three pieces. 2D, 3D and video works are eligible. Work must have been completed prior to application submission. Work that is available for sale is preferred, but if your project fits the theme and is not commercially available, please submit!

IMPORTANT DATES

  • February 5-25, 2019: Submission period.
  • March 17, 2019: Notification of acceptance
  • May 20, 2019: Selected artwork due to form & concept
  • May 31, 2019: Opening reception, 5-7 pm
  • July 13, 2019: Exhibition closes
  • July 31, 2019: All work received by artists (unless otherwise arranged)

CURATORS

Renata de Carvalho Gaui is an artist, designer and creative technologist from Rio de Janeiro. In recent years, she has worked on projects involving wearable technology research and design, educational and experiential exhibit design, and female empowerment.

Francesca Rodriguez Sawaya is a Peruvian designer and educator. She uses her skills as a technologist and storyteller to craft compelling narratives about sociocultural realities. Her work revolves around connecting the digital and physical spaces around us, as a way of bringing a more human approach to our digital world.

They both graduated from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU, where they collaborated on artistic projects regarding female empowerment and identity, building bridges between craft and technology disciplines, and educational partnerships between ITP and public schools around New York. They were both organizers and facilitators for these projects.

CONTACT

Jordan Eddy
formandconcept [at] gmail [dot] com
505.982.8111

Click here to learn more & submit.

Opening: Erika Lynne Hanson

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Arizona artist Erika Lynne Hanson weaves a hidden history of the Southwest into her solo exhibition Movement Choir: Landscape Scores. Using a coded language in her fiber and new media artworks, Hanson charts the paths of Cold War missile tests from Green River, Utah to White Sands, New Mexico. The rusty remnants, scattered over more than 600 miles of desert, represent open questions about the nature of humanity and our relationship to nature. Movement Choir: Landscape Scores debuts on Friday, May 25 from 5 to 7 pm, with an artist talk on Saturday, May 26, 2-3 pm.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Last Look | Jodi Colella: Unidentified Women

“75% of the women were labeled ‘unidentified.’ And that just struck a chord with me, how these lives and labors were lost.”

Unidentified Women made its debut in Santa Fe on January 26th. Fiber artist Jodi Colella appeared at the gallery for the opening reception and artist talk. Afterwards, she sat down with us to discuss the inspiration for her moving exhibition.

It started somewhere among the vast archives of the Historic Northampton Museum in Northampton, Massachusetts. Jodi Colella was working on an art project inspired by the museum’s headwear collection, and she stumbled upon a series of daguerreotype portraits. “They were like little 19th century selfies,” Colella says. “I noticed that all the men in the images had every single detail of their life listed in the catalog. About 80% of the women were labeled ‘unidentified.’” The artist was fascinated by these forgotten, female faces, and the contrast between the women’s fleeting social visibility and their invisibility to history. After hunting down similar portraits in flea markets and antique shops, Colella stitched intricate embroideries across the images, further obscuring the women’s identities.

Opening: Jodi Colella | Unidentified Women

RSVP on Facebook.

It started somewhere among the vast archives of the Historic Northampton Museum in Northampton, Massachusetts. Fiber artist Jodi Colella was working on an art project inspired by the museum’s headwear collection, and she stumbled upon a series of daguerreotype portraits. “They were like little 19th century selfies,” Colella says. “I noticed that all the men in the images had every single detail of their life listed in the catalog. About 80% of the women were labeled ‘unidentified.’”

The artist was fascinated by these forgotten, female faces, and the contrast between the women’s fleeting social visibility and their invisibility to history. After hunting down similar portraits in flea markets and antique shops, Colella stitched intricate embroideries across the images, further obscuring the women’s identities. The body of work, titled Unidentified Women, makes its Santa Fe debut at form & concept on Friday, January 26 from 5-7 pm. Colella will appear at the opening reception, and also conduct an artist talk and preview on Thursday, January 25 from 2-3 pm.

Events 

Artist Talk & Preview: Thursday, January 25, 2-3 pm | RSVP on Facebook.
Opening Reception: Friday, January 26, 5-7 pm | RSVP on Facebook.

Learn more about this exhibition.

Introducing Lisa Klakulak

Lisa Klakulak Artist Portrait- American Craft Magazine- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak. Photo by Michael Mauney for American Craft Magazine.

Lisa Klakulak first exhibited at form & concept this winter in Shifting Landscapes, our juried show with Surface Design Association. She’s a longtime member of the organization, and her work was a perfect fit for the place-themed show. Klakulak has traveled the world studying the textiles of diverse cultures, from Appalachia to India, West Africa and Spain. On her far-flung travels, she also takes in the flora, fauna and geography that surrounds her in search of inspiration. Her contribution to Shifting Landscapes captured the dynamism of glacial formations in a series of vivid blue necklaces:

Lisa Klakulak- Felt Necklaces- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico

Now Klakulak is one of our newest represented artists, and she draws inspiration from lava flows in a fresh series of wearable artworks. We’ve been eagerly learning about her travels and their impact on her work. It came as no surprise that she was featured in American Craft Magazine, in a lovely profile about her inclination for globe-trotting:

Travel is a crucial artistic resource for Klakulak. And yet art is not what compels her to leave home. “The places I’ve chosen to go are dramatically different from the world I live in. Travel turns my world upside down and challenges me,” she says. “My artwork is how I process these visual and emotional experiences. I wouldn’t say that I travel to make art; I make art because I travel.”

Klakulak has been artistic since she was very young, growing up in the suburbs of Detroit. Her interest in culturally diverse travel emerged in her teens. On one trip to the Caribbean with her father, she recalls being more intrigued by the people working at the resort than by the other guests. Then there was the eye-opening class trip to Nicaragua during her college years at Colorado State University, where she earned a degree in fiber arts in 1997. But it was two years after graduation, on a six-month spiritual and artistic quest with a boyfriend through India, Nepal, and Thailand, that she began to meld art and travel.

“It was the most monumental trip of my life,” she says. Forgoing the beaten path in favor of rural villages rife with textile traditions – once traveling a week by camel – she was taken by the “magnificence of work made with the simplest of materials. The poverty of materials and resources but the richness of the forms was totally inspiring,” she recalls. She gravitated to the highly ornamented Rajasthani embroidery of northwestern India and natural dye processes, as well as patterns in the landscape, and returned to the United States eager to expand her knowledge of fiber arts.

From there, Klakulak worked as a teaching assistant at the Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina, where she took up the medium of felt in 2000. She went on to complete a two-year residency at the Appalachian Center for Craft in Tennessee. She taught felting and other textile techniques to public schoolchildren through the center’s outreach program, an experience that kickstarted her ongoing teaching work and advocacy for fiber art as an important component of the visual art curriculum. Now residing in a cabin in Asheville, North Carolina, she continues to create wearable textiles, accessories and non-functional sculpture. She also teaches workshops around the world, of course. “For me, the medium is life,” she told American Craft. “That’s the art; it’s what you do with your life.”

Lisa Klakulak Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Tuff Ring Necklace, merino wool fiber, metallic silk organza, tulle fabric, cotton rope , cotton thread, found stones at Kalbarri Nat Park Western Australia, nylon netting wet felted, free-motion machine stitched, $900.
Lisa Klakulak Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Intertwined Hoop Earrings, merino wool fiber, metallic silk organza, tulle fabric, cotton thread, found beach glass, sterling silver hoops, needle and wet felting, free-motion machine embroidered, $460.
Lisa Klakulak Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Bracelet with 3D Tabs, merino wool fiber, cotton thread, waxed linen thread, stainless steel armature, leather, wet felting, naturally dyed with cochineal and osage, free-motion machine embroidered, hand stitched, $260.
Lisa Klakulak Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Circuitous Path Choker, merino wool fiber, metallic silk organza, tulle fabric, cotton thread, found beach glass, wet felted, free-motion machine stitched, $1200.
Lisa Klakulak Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Trampoline Earrings, merino wool fiber, metallic silk organza, tulle fabric, cotton thread, found beach glass, sterling silver hoops, needle and wet feling, naturally dyed with madder, free-motion machine embroidered, $430.
Lisa Klakulak Art- Form and Concept Gallery- Santa Fe New Mexico
Lisa Klakulak, Wool Bracelet, merino wool fiber, cotton thread, waxed linen thread, stainless steel armature, leather, wet felting, free-motion machine embroidered, hand stitched, $240.

Click here to browse all of Klakulak’s work on the form & concept website, and make sure to read the rest of Melissa Reardon’s profile of the artist in American Craft.

Preview: Mark Newport’s Mending

Mark Newport Artwork- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Mark Newport, From Within (detail), embroidery on muslin, 75″ x 33″

This February, Mark Newport will return to form & concept for a solo exhibition that cuts to the heart of the Michigan textile artist’s practice. His new body of work, Mending, features torn muslin cloths with meticulously embroidered patches, a symbol of the scars that life etches on the body and psyche. Mark will be in Santa Fe for the Mending opening reception on Friday, February 24 from 5-7 pm, and will speak at our gallery talk the following day.

The artwork in Mending stands in stark contrast to the artist’s first exhibition at form & concept. In our ReFashion group show, Mark presented hand-knit superhero suits. We spoke with the artist by phone about the new series, and how it evolved from his earlier work. 

Mark Newport Artwork- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Mark Newport, From Within, embroidery on muslin, 75″ x 33″

Tell us about the inspiration behind Mending.

I’m exploring the idea of repair and scarring, to make a connection between textile and the body in that way. I’ve been researching and using traditional textile mending techniques that I examined on trips to New York, Boston, London and Amsterdam. 

What’s the history of these techniques?

I first learned about mending samplers when I was in college. People, mostly women, were taught these things to learn a trade, so that they could take care of themselves. Frugality and economy were part of the culture then, which we don’t have as much now. I’m using the same process to repair tears in off-white cloth, and examining the relationship between stitches on a cloth and stitches on a body.

How did you make that connection?

I’m interested in this idea of reconstructing something better than it was. Maybe there’s a lie in the textile; it’s not what it originally was. If you have a stain on your favorite shirt, or you patch up your favorite jeans, they’re not the same anymore. But maybe they’re even better now because they lived through that.

It’s the same thing with the body. When it’s scarred, it might not be such a negative thing.

Do you have a lot of scars?

I was a very accident-prone child. I have some scars. I have always thought of scars as this record of where you’ve been. ‘That was the time I fell on my bike, or that’s when I had appendix surgery.’

Mark Newport Artwork- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Mark Newport, Mend 6, embroidery on muslin, 17″ x 13″

The work in Mending is very different from the superhero suits you exhibited in our ReFashion show. How did that transition happen?

It took a while for me to get to this point. I had worked on the costumes and other pop culture-related work since around 1995. When I had been working on the costumes for 8 or 9 years, I got to the point where I had explored that line of thinking and that way of working to its fullest. I gave myself time to think about new ways of working, and wrestled with that for a couple of years.

Underneath the pop culture trappings of the earlier work, the body was always part of it. The costume suggests the body, masculinity, armor. With Mending, it’s more about vulnerability and exposing flaws. I’m flipping that coin on its head.

Has this project lead you to confront your own vulnerability?

I’m at a time when I’m a little bit older, so my body isn’t as certain as it used to be. As I age, I think about how things have changed and what that means.

I love being an artist, because you have this ability to explore things in a way that you don’t always have the opportunity to do. The work slows me down, and gives me a chance to think.

Join Mark Newport at the opening reception of Mending on February 24, and attend our gallery talk on February 25 to learn more about his work.

Mark Newport Artwork- Form and Concept- Santa Fe New Mexico
Mark Newport, Mend 4, embroidery on muslin, 75″ x 33″